Optometry Tomorrow 2018

Date:

18 - 19 March 2018 Add to calendar

Location:

Hilton Birmingham Metropole, The NEC Birmingham, Pendigo Way, Marston Green, Birmingham B40 1PP

Conference CET 15

Programme

Please see below the full programme for Optometry Tomorrow 2018. 

Sorry, no sessions were found matching your filters.

You must book a minimum of 6 sessions for this day.

8.00 AM

No description provided

9.25 AM

No description provided

9.35 AM

This lecture will demonstrate how we use ‘big data’ extracted from routine NHS clinics to assess health service delivery of age-related eye disease. The session will also speculate how vision data collected whilst someone carries out everyday activities might be used to monitor visual function loss.
Delegates will learn about:
• Using large repositories of visual field data to assess health service delivery of glaucoma
• Factors that contribute to late presentation of glaucoma in case finding
• Potential of eye movement data as a marker for visual function loss.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease, Ocular examination and Standards of practice

Target Group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand more about health service delivery in glaucoma clinics and so when to refer patients appropriately
  • To understand more about large scale visual field data and its relationship in the diagnosis of glaucoma
  • To understand current research around visual field data and the potential of eye movement data as a marker for visual function loss and how this may be used for diagnosis and management of ocular disease such as glaucoma

Speakers

Professor David Crabb

Delegates will learn

  • The use of teleophthalmology in a first world setting
  • Artificial intelligence for detecting visually threatening diabetic retinopathy: friend or foe?
  • OCT interpretation in diabetic eye disease: beyond diagnosis oedema

Speakers

Dawn Sim

This seminar will cover: 

  • evidence covering the safety, clinical effectiveness, views of stakeholders (including patients, optometrists, ophthalmologists, GPs and commissioners), and the cost effectiveness of schemes 
  • what makes optometrists want to be involved in schemes and the place of training to support their involvement 
  • breaking apart the 'one-size-fits-all' model to get to the practical points about implementation

Speakers

Mike Bowen

This session will give a short introduction to OCT and optic nerve head interpretation followed by discussion on case studies. Delegates will be able to:

  • Recognise glaucomatous changes with OCT
  • Improve confidence in identifying early glaucomatous changes
  • Use OCT to make more informed glaucoma referrals

Speakers

Dr Alice McTrusty

This workshop aims to help with difficulties encountered when using Volk by giving time to practical experience, sharing hints and tips for successful fundus viewing, as well as help getting to grips with orientation and lesion location. There will be a  range of lenses available to help with the dilemma of which lens for which condition by enabling delegates to try out a range of lenses available and so appreciate and experience the relative advantages and disadvantages. There will also be an opportunity to share hints and tips for successful fundus viewing and orientation.

Target group: Optometrist
Learning objectives:
• To understand the advantages and disadvantages of using a Volk lens to perform indirect ophthalmoscopy and understand the basic principles of the technique.
• To understand the variety of Volk lenses available and appreciate their relative advantages and disadvantages and make an appropriate choice when examining the peripheral retina, optic disc or macula.
• To understand the advantages of using indirect ophthalmoscopy to view the fundus for patients with lens opacities.

Competencies covered: ocular examination

Speakers

Sarah Dawson MCOptom

This discussion workshop will cover all aspects of how to communicate effectively when referring a patient to ensure that the person triaging the referral is able to make the best decision in navigating the patient to the most appropriate care setting for their consultation. The type of cases and referrals discussed will cover ocular conditions found commonly in optometric practice. It will discuss the appropriate investigations and management and how to best communicate with other healthcare professionals.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand when it is necessary to refer a patient and make an appropriate referral to the right person in an appropriate timescale
  • To understand how to communicate effectively when making a referral of a patient to another professional
  • To understand how to work most effectively with healthcare professionals and how to make clear and appropriate referrals
  • To improve the understanding of a variety of common ocular conditions and how to refer them appropriately to the right person and within the appropriate timescale.

Speakers

Wendy Newsom MCOptom

No description provided

A convenient bite-sized round-up of the latest evidence that says it is worth our time to discuss diet and lifestyle with our patients during an eye examination – covering everything from AMD to cataracts to dry eye, and more.

More information on the content of hthis session will follow. 
This session focuses on the steps required to embrace myopia management in practice and will include:
  • A brief review of myopia prevalence and future prevalence predictions
  • Communication guidance to discuss myopia management options with parent and child
  • Parent and child testimonials on their experience with soft contact lens
  • Management of myopia application and removal strategies for young wearers
  • Aftercare management plan.

Speakers

Shail Patel

No description provided

10.40 AM

This lecture will enable delegates to learn:

  • Why Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) are important
  • What a Cataract PROM is trying to measure and knowing a good PROM from a poor PROM
  • What’s relevant for optometrists in the NICE Cataract surgery guideline

Speakers

Professor John Sparrow HonFCOptom

This session will provide an introduction to orthokeratology, covering history, technological development, design, communication, fitting principles, management of outcome and the wider benefits of safety and myopia control. Delegates will be guided through the assessment and fitting routines, with reference to global clinical studies outlining the long term benefits of tear film stability and management of the worldwide myopic epidemic.

Speakers

Nick Howard

Today’s patients expect a great deal more from their optometrists than the old “detect and refer” approach, and the scope of clinical optometry increases rapidly. In this session, we will discuss efficient ways of staying “up to date” with emerging evidence, and examine several recent clinical trials that are relevant to practising optometrist. Further, the talk will review important statistical and epidemiological concepts that are relevant in the consulting room. Specifically, we will examine how to correctly interpret positive (i.e, “abnormal”) test outcomes when the prevalence of the condition is low, to arrive at a useful balance of sensitivity and specificity. We will discuss how best to communicate risks and other uncertainties with members of the public. In an interactive element at the close of the lecture, we will discuss with audience members how the pointers covered in this talk may influence their day-to-day clinical work.

Speakers

Professor Paul Artes MCOptom

This session will give a short introduction to OCT and optic nerve head interpretation followed by discussion on case studies. Delegates will be able to:

  • Recognise glaucomatous changes with OCT
  • Improve confidence in identifying early glaucomatous changes
  • Use OCT to make more informed glaucoma referrals

Speakers

Dr Alice McTrusty

This workshop aims to help with difficulties encountered when using Volk by giving time to practical experience, sharing hints and tips for successful fundus viewing, as well as help getting to grips with orientation and lesion location. There will be a  range of lenses available to help with the dilemma of which lens for which condition by enabling delegates to try out a range of lenses available and so appreciate and experience the relative advantages and disadvantages. There will also be an opportunity to share hints and tips for successful fundus viewing and orientation.

Target group: Optometrist
Learning objectives:
• To understand the advantages and disadvantages of using a Volk lens to perform indirect ophthalmoscopy and understand the basic principles of the technique.
• To understand the variety of Volk lenses available and appreciate their relative advantages and disadvantages and make an appropriate choice when examining the peripheral retina, optic disc or macula.
• To understand the advantages of using indirect ophthalmoscopy to view the fundus for patients with lens opacities.

Competencies covered: ocular examination

Speakers

Sarah Dawson MCOptom

This discussion workshop will cover all aspects of how to communicate effectively when referring a patient to ensure that the person triaging the referral is able to make the best decision in navigating the patient to the most appropriate care setting for their consultation. The type of cases and referrals discussed will cover ocular conditions found commonly in optometric practice. It will discuss the appropriate investigations and management and how to best communicate with other healthcare professionals.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand when it is necessary to refer a patient and make an appropriate referral to the right person in an appropriate timescale
  • To understand how to communicate effectively when making a referral of a patient to another professional
  • To understand how to work most effectively with healthcare professionals and how to make clear and appropriate referrals
  • To improve the understanding of a variety of common ocular conditions and how to refer them appropriately to the right person and within the appropriate timescale.

Speakers

Wendy Newsom MCOptom

This seminar will discuss the diagnosis and managment of dry eye disease, including therapeutic management for the various types and how the management of each individual condition varies. It will provide an insight into the diagnosis and management of dry eye conditions and allow practitioners to expand and update their present knowledge on the topic. 

Speakers

Dr Louise Madden MCOptom

Topcon's session is titled 'Understanding OCT'.

This session will provide an opportunity for delegates to understand how the growing use of OCT in primary eye care can help refine referrals and improve patient care. A short presentation will cover the basics of OCT retinal and disc interpretation, looking at both normal and abnormal eyes. Delegates will then have the opportunity to identify the retinal layers and interpret images of common abnormal conditions. Tips for maximising image quality will be covered with reference to identification of the retinal layers, and feedback provided by instructors to enhance learning. 

CooperVision's session is titled 'Right product for the right patient.' 

This session will encourage delegates to think about their approach to patient management and advice relating to the fitting and aftercare of soft contact lenses. Delegates will discuss two different patient scenarios. You will be given a clinical photograph, brief case history and a series of discussion points related to diagnosis and management. 

 

Speakers

Shail Patel

Laura Pigula

Rebecca Stoner MCOptom

Historically, keeping patients happy as they become presbyopic hasn’t been easy. With presbyopic patients most frequently citing poor vision as the reason for discontinuing wear, what can we do to make these patients happy again? This multi-station discussion workshop, featuring topics on the aging tear film, pupils and ocular dominance, will help to equip you with the skills you need to maximise success for your presbyopic patients. 

This session will be delivered as a discussion workshop. 

Speakers

Dr Rachel Hiscox MCOptom

No description provided

11.40 AM

No description provided

12.05 PM

No description provided

Delegates will learn

  • Current knowledge of myopia development
  • Myopia management and control
  • An overview of incorporating myopia control into routine practice

Speakers

Dr Susie Jones MCOptom

This seminar will take the form of a debate between two optometrists working in contrasting optical practices, one a Director of a Specsavers, the other, owner his own Independent practice.
Neil & Parth will discuss, with specific examples, how an ECP may be torn between doing what is best for the Patient and what is best for him or herself. This will include time constraints, profit considerations and also day to day recommendation decisions.  The focus will be on conundrums that may occur every day for an ECP. Specific examples will be used from each speaker’s vast experience together with hypothetical ones, as sparks for debate.

Speakers

Neil Constantine-Smith MCOptom

Dr Parth Shah MCOptom

This workshop will provide delegates with the opportunity to increase their confidence in the identification of a range of features identified on OCT scans and their relevance to a range of clinical conditions and their management in line with national management guideline.
Utilising voting pad technology, this interactive discussion session will cover a range of medical retina conditions. The workshop is aimed primarily at clinicians who are relatively inexperienced in this skill and who wish to gain experience in a supportive and fun environment but there will be some interesting and more unusual cases to challenge the more experienced clinicians too.

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives
• To recognise the features within OCT scans.
• To analyse an OCT plot and appreciate the clinical significance when investigating macular degeneration.
• To analyse an OCT plot and appreciate the clinical significance in diabetic eye disease.
• To utilise information gathered from OCT scans in conjunction with other relevant information to recognise a range of medical retina conditions and manage them appropriately in line with national guidelines.

Competencies covered

Ocular examination and ocular disease

Speakers

Kate Powell MCOptom

This interactive workshop will enable optometrists to develop their hands-on skills in gonioscopy. There will be an introduction to the basic principles of gonioscopy followed by an opportunity to practice on patients. Particular attention will be made towards differentiating between open and closed angle glaucoma, as well as looking for key signs of pathology identified on gonioscopy, This will help optometrists improve the range of services they can offer to their patients and work towards engaging in glaucoma enhanced schemes. 

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to use a slit lamp and gonioscopy lens to examine the anterior chamber 
  • To be able to differentiate between open and closed angle glaucoma using gonioscopy 
  • To be able to recognise abnormalities identified through gonioscopy and understand when to refer 

Speakers

Patrick Gunn MCOptom

Using patient case studies from community and hospital practice, delegates will:

  • Discuss interpretation of optic nerve head images and visual field plots when the data are ambiguous, unreliable or incomplete
  • Discuss clinical decision-making for glaucoma related conditions, following the updated NICE CG85 glaucoma guideline
  • Develop strategies to make safe, appropriate but not overcautious clinical decisions in the presence of uncertainty

Speakers

Angela Whitaker MCOptom

No description provided

Whilst blepharitis continues to be a hot topic in optometry, there are more reasons than you probably realise to advise your patients on the ‘TLC’ eyelids deserve. This CET-accredited talk will run through key points for discussion with your patients that also include advising patients about pre-ocular surgery and intra-vitreal injections, cosmetics and cosmesis, blinking, dry eye and whole ocular surface health. By the end of the session delegates will find there are several reasons why eyelids are something to focus on with the slit lamp, and not just the cornea!

 

Speakers

Professor Christine Purslow MCOptom

Spectral domain OCT is the current standard of care in ophthalmology, and you could argue, primary eye care too. However, OCT technology continues to evolve at a rapid rate with a number of manufacturers releasing swept source OCT devices. This workshop provides a brief introduction to swept source OCT and discusses the advantages over spectral domain. Delegates will have the opportunity to capture swept source images and discuss clinical cases in which swept source is particularly advantageous.
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the deeper OCT scan findings made possible with swept source OCT, and is able to explain OCT findings to a patient in a way that is easy to understand, making use of the images available.
  • Understand when a patient with poor optical media, may benefit from referral to a colleague with access to a swept source OCT device, to facilitate OCT imaging of the retina, and refine referral.
  • Uses a technique that is suitable for examining the fundus in a patient with media opacities
  • Appreciate the differences in media opacity penetration between spectral domain and swept source devices, and how this can be applied to the examination of patients with cataract 
  • Understands the benefits of a single Acquisition that captures a colour fundus image and OCT scan from sclera to vitreous, covering the disc and macular regions, particularly in relation to children and elderly or less cooperative patients. 
  • Understands how an invisible scanning wavelength can be less distracting for the patient and enable the capture of better quality OCT images particularly in relation to children and elderly or less cooperative patients.
  • Understand the importance of examining the choroid, in particular the choroidal thickness, in posterior uveitis and pachychoroid diseases such as central serous retinopathy.

This session is aimed at delegates of all levels and will be delivered as a discussion workshop. 

Speakers

Laura Pigula

Rebecca Stoner MCOptom

Are your toric lenses fitting comfortably, without disorientating? Toric wearers over-index in contact lens wearer drop-outs, most commonly citing poor vision as the reason for discontinuation. This multi-station discussion workshop will encourage you think about the best ways to manage patients with astigmatism in practice, with respect to both toric design and material properties.

Speakers

Dr Rachel Hiscox MCOptom

No description provided

1.05 PM

No description provided

2.05 PM

Chronic glaucoma is a common problem in elderly patients. Because optometrists are usually the first eye care professionals that a patient sees, it is important that the diagnosis is suspected at that stage and an appropriate referral made. This lecture covers most aspects that need to be considered when diagnosing chronic glaucoma and in particular illustrates the mistakes that can be made by not fully examining the patient.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how important it is to take a good history in a patient who might have glaucoma
  • To understand the important of the examination of the optic disc and key features to detect glaucoma
  • To understand the importance of correlating the optic disc appearance with  visual field defect and its relevance in the detection of glaucoma

Speakers

Dr John Salmon

Imaging technologies have proven fundamental to many advances in the understanding and treatment of ocular disease. In the 1990s, the introduction of a wholly new form of non-invasive cross-sectional imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT), revolutionised the management of retinal disease. Such technology has become increasingly common, and for many it has become a normal part of the eye examination. OCT technology continues to develop rapidly. Not only can newer versions of current technology produce better images, but a brand new technology - termed “Binocular OCT" can change the nature of the eye examination once again. Binocular OCT can simultaneously image the whole-eye of subjects (cornea to retina), as well as being able to image both eyes at the same time. This means that a range of ocular diagnostic tests (from ocular movements to pupillometry) can be obtained in an automated manner. It also allows objective, reproducible, quantitative measurements to be made for each of these tests. Thus, Binocular OCT will greatly improve the diagnosis and treatment of common ocular diseases affecting the cornea (e.g., keratoconus), retina (e.g. age-related macular degeneration), and optic nerve head (e.g., glaucoma), and has the potential to “reinvent the eye exam” for the 21st Century. The lecture will allow for reflection on the limitations of current examination techniques, and discussion on the benefits to referrals - both in accuracy and timescale of referrals. Discussion will also focus on the challenges optometrists may experience in interpreting any OCT image, and how they can become more confident at such.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease, Ocular examination and Standards of practice

Target Group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand the advances in OCT imaging making their way from research into practice: to appreciate the benefits offered and the potential impact on our patient care
  • Understanding of the benefits offered by OCT (including binocular OCT) in classifying signs suggestive of glaucoma, and of monitoring known cases of glaucoma
  • Understanding of the benefits offered by OCT (including binocular OCT) in classifying signs of AMD - to aid both diagnosis and monitoring of AMD cases
  • Understanding of the benefits offered by binocular OCT in measuring and assessing the integrity of the cornea
  • Understanding of the benefits offered by binocular OCT in examining the fundus, and how it compares to OCT and other fundus examination techniques.

Speakers

Dr Pearse Keane

The session will consider how active compassion can enhance health outcomes, increase job satisfaction and improve business performance.
-We will consider the definitions of compassion and innate kindness, and how it can be used as tool to enhance the care we give.
-We will learn about ways we can actively use compassion in the optometric consulting room
-Reflect on situations where a lack of organisational compassion has led to serious harm
-Consider compassion within NHS organisations
-Consider how compassion is being embraced by the business community
-Lean techniques to practice and hone compassionate awareness and action in optometry
-Discuss the concept of giving compassion to yourself to improve the care you give and reduce workplace stress
-Understand why compassion is an essential component of clinical leadership

Speakers

Daniel Hardiman-McCartney MCOptom

This session is a practical workshop covering the assessment and management of tropias and phorias, convergence, accommodation and the movement of extraocular muscles as part of a routine eye examination. 
Delegates will be given advice and guidance on how to assess eye movements objectively as well as subjectively. 
Delegates will gain a better understanding of patient management to improve visual comfort and the role of BV in myopia progression. 

Speakers

Dr Aleksandra Mankowska MCOptom

Caroline Chambers MCOptom

Andrew J E Smith FCOptom

Dr Eve Panesar

The workshop will allow practitioners to use modern instrumentation for assessment of corneal shape, using a corneal topographer.

Application and assessment of chosen reverse geometry lenses, with the instillation of fluorescein will allow observation of typical patterns and discussion of necessary adjustments required.

Removal of reverse geometry lenses with appropriate supervision, care and patient communication, followed by reflective discussion on comfort and potential reversal of myopic or astigmatic refractive error.

Speakers

Nick Howard

This skills workshop is designed to provide an opportunity for optometrists to refresh their skills in dynamic retinoscopy as a means by which to evaluate accommodative function. Case records will be used to illustrate the value of this objective method of determining the accuracy of accommodative responses in relation to making decisions about prescribing for hyperopic refractive errors, evaluating near vision function and providing optometric care for typically developing children and patients with learning and communication difficulties. Published normative data will be presented and discussed in order to help contextualise clinical measures and aid in determining management options. A review of the techniques available to undertake dynamic retinoscopy will be provided and an opportunity to try a modified Nott dynamic retinoscopy technique will be offered.

Competencies covered: Assessment of visual function

Target Group: Optometrist

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the principals underpinning and the methodology used to undertake dynamic retinoscopy 
  • To appreciate the value of dynamic retinoscopy in assessing accommodative accuracy and near visual function in children and those with learning/communication difficulties
  • To appreciate the normative data available to support the use of dynamic retinoscopy measures in clinical practice

Speakers

Professor Kathryn Saunders

No description provided

More information on the content will follow. 

More information on the content to follow. 

No description provided

3.10 PM
The prevalence of myopia is escalating at an alarming rate worldwide, with 5 billion people expected to be affected worldwide by 2050. Of more concern is that the degree of myopia in the population also appears to be increasing and with this there is an increased risk factor for potentially sight threatening ocular pathologies, including cataract, glaucoma, retinal detachment and myopic maculopathy. The presentation will review current research in myopia development, progression and amelioration. Eye care professionals urgently need to reconsider their clinical practice approach in relation to management of myopia which is no longer an optical convenience, but a modifiable risk factor for sight-threatening disease.
Learning objectives:
• An understanding of the current and projected trends in myopia development
• To challenge conventional wisdom in relation to myopia and its risk
• An understanding of the latest research in relation to potential therapeutic options for the control of myopia

Speakers

Dr Nicola Logan MCOptom

This session covers non-tolerance problems that patients can encounter with their spectacles due to anomalies in prescriptions, lens designs and dispensing errors. The aim of the session is to identify and avoid potential problems that can result is us failing to meet patient expectations.
 
The patient should always be at the centre of any recommendations or decisions we make and it is important that we listen to their needs and understand the products available to provide them with the best optical solution.  Whilst we have better methods of manufacturing lenses and designs that are improving all the time, we also need to understand how these lenses work and make sure that we take all appropriate measurements and can recommend lens designs to meet individual needs.

Speakers

Paula Baines

Delegates in this session will learn:

  • Latest outputs of the Vision Loss Expert Group on global burden of blindness and vision impairment and its causes and projections to the future (recently published by The Lancet)
  • Introduction to the online ‘Vision Atlas’ hosted by the International Agency for Prevention of Blindness
  • Making this data actionable- efforts to heighten awareness in all countries and making the case for population-based assessment of eye disease, eg. the UK National Eye Health Survey

Speakers

Professor Rupert Bourne

This session is a practical workshop covering the assessment and management of tropias and phorias, convergence, accommodation and the movement of extraocular muscles as part of a routine eye examination. 

Delegates will be given advice and guidance on how to assess eye movements objectively as well as subjectively. 

Delegates will gain a better understanding of patient management to improve visual comfort and the role of BV in myopia progression. 

Speakers

Dr Aleksandra Mankowska MCOptom

Caroline Chambers MCOptom

Andrew J E Smith FCOptom

Dr Eve Panesar

This interactive workshop will enable optometrists to develop their hands-on skills in gonioscopy. There will be an introduction to the basic principles of gonioscopy followed by an opportunity to practice on patients. Particular attention will be made towards differentiating between open and closed angle glaucoma, as well as looking for key signs of pathology identified on gonioscopy, This will help optometrists improve the range of services they can offer to their patients and work towards engaging in glaucoma enhanced schemes. 

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to use a slit lamp and gonioscopy lens to examine the anterior chamber 
  • To be able to differentiate between open and closed angle glaucoma using gonioscopy 
  • To be able to recognise abnormalities identified through gonioscopy and understand when to refer 

Speakers

Patrick Gunn MCOptom

This skills workshop is designed to provide an opportunity for optometrists to refresh their skills in dynamic retinoscopy as a means by which to evaluate accommodative function. Case records will be used to illustrate the value of this objective method of determining the accuracy of accommodative responses in relation to making decisions about prescribing for hyperopic refractive errors, evaluating near vision function and providing optometric care for typically developing children and patients with learning and communication difficulties. Published normative data will be presented and discussed in order to help contextualise clinical measures and aid in determining management options. A review of the techniques available to undertake dynamic retinoscopy will be provided and an opportunity to try a modified Nott dynamic retinoscopy technique will be offered.

Competencies covered: Assessment of visual function

Target Group: Optometrist

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the principals underpinning and the methodology used to undertake dynamic retinoscopy 
  • To appreciate the value of dynamic retinoscopy in assessing accommodative accuracy and near visual function in children and those with learning/communication difficulties
  • To appreciate the normative data available to support the use of dynamic retinoscopy measures in clinical practice

Speakers

Professor Kathryn Saunders

More information on content to follow. 

Speakers

Catherine Duggan

No 7 Contact Lenses' session is titled 'Topography for dry eye assessment'.

The session will introduce the attendees to the concept of video capture of tear film surface quality using a reflection videokeratoscopy (topography) system. The capture of the video and data will be demonstrated and the principles behind this method will be discussed. Analysis of the captured data will demonstrate what a normal tear film looks like and what the indices show. An example of an abnormal tear film will also be shown and contrasted with normal. Strategies for explaining the images, video and data will be given and the attendees will have the opportunity to discuss this. 

Johnson and Johnson Vision's session is titled 'Multifocal contact lens fitting made easy'.

The session will introduce you to the key factors which should be considered with fitting presbyopic patients with contact lenses. A live demo session featuring a Soft Multifocal Contact Lens fit will be included, with discussion about each stage of the fitting process and how this can differ from one lens to another.

Speakers

Robyn Marsden MCOptom

Katie Harrop MCOptom

Dry eye disease is a common disorder of the tear film caused by decreased tear production or increased evaporation and presents with a wide variety of signs and symptoms. This workshop will discuss the signs and symptoms of dry eye, including the diagnosis of either aqueous deficiency or evaporative dry eye and the latest treatments available, including IPL therapy for meibomian gland dysfunction. Guided discussion based on patient cases will provide relevant information to help you recognise dry eye disease and support your patients - ultimately increasing their quality of life.

Speakers

Laura Pigula

Rebecca Stoner MCOptom

This discussion workshop is based around 4 cases of patients who wear or are seeking to wear soft toric contact lenses. The cases include clinical images, patient history and a patient record card. The cases are designed to stimulate discussion on the assessment and suitability of patients, fitting of toric lenses, aftercare of toric lenses and how best to communicate the benefits of toric lenses to patients. The cases include existing wearers as well as new fits. The cases cover the management of abnormalities including pinguecula, blepharitis, lens deposition and neovascularisation. They also include management of fitting and selection of the correct power.

Speakers

Mark Chatham

No description provided

4.10 PM

No description provided

4.35 PM
Delegates will learn
 
  • A range of allergic eye diseases and their severity and manifestations
  • The underlying immune causes in brief to help plan intelligent treatment response
  • Key points for treating safely and avoiding drug side effects

Speakers

Melanie Hingorani

Having an increased awareness and making simple adaptations to practice can make a huge difference for a person with complex needs. This seminar will look at :
  • Communication tips when communicating with someone who is living with sight loss and complex needs, Pre, during and post appointment.
  • Discussion around current practice for people living with sight loss and complex needs and action plan for what adaptations could be made for complex needs friendly principles of practice.
  • Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) a young onset dementia that presents itself with visual difficulties initially, including case studies from patients.

Speakers

Iain Kennedy

Please note you must be a College Supervisor to attend this session. 

Supervision is immensley enjoyable but it is also time consuming. In this session Supervisors will explore practical ways of ensuring that trainees are clinically competent whilst maintaining your clinical workload. 

The format and number of CET points for this session are TBC. 

Speakers

Ruth Bennett MCOptom

This workshop will provide delegates with the opportunity to increase their confidence in the identification of a range of features identified on OCT scans and their relevance to a range of clinical conditions and their management in line with national management guideline.
Utilising voting pad technology, this interactive discussion session will cover a range of medical retina conditions. The workshop is aimed primarily at clinicians who are relatively inexperienced in this skill and who wish to gain experience in a supportive and fun environment but there will be some interesting and more unusual cases to challenge the more experienced clinicians too.

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives
• To recognise the features within OCT scans.
• To analyse an OCT plot and appreciate the clinical significance when investigating macular degeneration.
• To analyse an OCT plot and appreciate the clinical significance in diabetic eye disease.
• To utilise information gathered from OCT scans in conjunction with other relevant information to recognise a range of medical retina conditions and manage them appropriately in line with national guidelines.

Competencies covered

Ocular examination and ocular disease

Speakers

Kate Powell MCOptom

With the ever expanding parameters available in soft contact lens designs, RGP contact lenses have become a niche market. This presentation will describe the benefits of RGP contact lenses and the need for these lenses to remain within armoury of lens options available to practicioners. Recent lens designs and lens materials will be discussed and pointers given to ensure success when fitting these lenses. Patient selection for successful fitting will be discussed. Delegates will be given hands on experience of fitting a patient with RGP lenses. The assessments and measurements required will be discussed and the process required to establish a good fitting lens will be described and demonstrated. 

Speakers

Malcolm McPherson MCOptom

Using patient case studies from community and hospital practice, delegates will:

  • Discuss interpretation of optic nerve head images and visual field plots when the data are ambiguous, unreliable or incomplete
  • Discuss clinical decision making for glaucoma related conditions, following the updated NICE CG85 glaucoma guideline
  • Develop strategies to make safe, appropriate but not overcautious clinical decisions in the presence of uncertainty

Speakers

Angela Whitaker MCOptom

This peer review session is open to IP qualified optometrists only.  

More information on the content will follow. 

This session is a peer review, delegates will be given futher information on the cases at a later date. 

No description provided

Sorry, no sessions were found matching your filters.

You must book a minimum of 6 sessions for this day.

8.00 AM

No description provided

9.00 AM

This lecture discusses the recently published TFOS DEWS II report. The report has brought together 150 global experts in dry eye from 23 countries to synthesise and report the latest evidence basis in a ~400 page report which will be presented in this talk. From a clinical perspective the presentation will cover:
- What is dry eye? - definition and classification
- Who is affected? - epidemiology
- Why does it occur? - pathophysiology
- When is it diagnosed as dry eye? - diagnostic methodology
- How do we manage it? - management and therapy

Competencies covered:

Optometrist: Communication, Ocular disease, Ocular examination and Standards of practice

Dispensing optician: Communication and Ocular abnormalities

Contact lens optician: Communication and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist, Dispensing optician and Contact lens optician

Learning objectives:

  • To understand the latest findings in dry eye disease and so to be able to explain effectively to patients about their eye condition
  • To understand the most effective ways to assess the tear film and diagnose dry eye disease
  • To understand the latest evidence in relation to dry eye and so carry out appropriate examinations and treatment
  • To understand the latest research on dry eye and so to carry out effective investigations and manage patients appropriately
  • To understand how to recognise and investigate the signs and symptoms of dry eye.

Speakers

Professor James Wolffsohn FCOptom

This seminar will include real cases of patients who attended a large ophthalmic emergency department. It will discuss the importance of history taking when examining these patients and the fact that the diagnosis is not always what you would expect. Detailed descriptions of the presenting signs and symptoms will be discussed as well as the differential diagnoses and referral criteria for such cases. Further investigations that are required when examining cases will be presented in particular the systemic investigations that are frequently necessary due to the strong association inflammatory conditions have with particular systemic conditions. The seminar will also cover the therapeutic management and treatment regimes. The presentation will cover differential diagnoses and the formulations of management plans based on clinical and further investigative results and the need for follow-up of these patients. The communication that is required when prescribing for patients will be discussed as well as the interaction that is necessary with Consultant ophthalmologists when dealing with these conditions.

Target Group: Optometrist and Therapeutic Optometrist

Competencies covered;

Optometrist: Communication and Ocular disease

Therapeutic Optometrist: Knowledge, Options, Share decision making, Safe and Information

Learning Objectives

  • To enable the practitioner to understand the importance of obtaining a full ocular and systemic health history when examining a patient who presents with an infective or inflammatory eye condition.
  • To improve the practitioner’s skill in asking questions to elicit the relevant details when a patient presents with an infective or inflammatory eye condition.
  • To improve the practitioner’s ability to interpret and investigate presenting symptoms of patients who present with either a red eye or floaters.
  • To enable the practitioner to recognise the signs, symptoms and severity of potential infectious or inflammatory eye disease. To improve the recognition of features which are diagnostic for these conditions and know the specific tests to be carried out to help aid their diagnosis. 
  • To improve the practitioner’s ability in taking the relevant history and presenting symptoms including specific questions to be asked in relation to the presenting symptom of a red eye or floaters.
  • To improve the practitioner’s understanding of the relevant tests to perform when examining patients who present with a red eye or symptoms of floaters. 
  • To enhance the practitioner’s ability to select the most appropriate drug and dosage to manage patients who present with a red eye or signs of uveitis.
  • To enhance the practitioner’s knowledge of information that is required to give to patients in relation to their medication, e.g. reasons for use, methods of instillation, frequency of use, potential side effects. 
  • To enable the practitioner to understand the importance and under what circumstances it is necessary to involve an ophthalmologist. 
  • To improve the practitioner’s understanding of the use of formularies that are available to non-medical prescribing optometrists within an NHS hospital trust. 

Speakers

Amanda Harding MCOptom

Helen Wilson MCOptom

This discussion workshop will cover an outline of the national diabetic eye screening programme in England, including the latest service standards, how images are graded, and referral criteria and options for treatment.
Cases will then be presented for grading and discussion, including an optometrists' responsibilities during a routine sight test.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To keep your knowledge of diabetic retinopathy screening up to date 
  • To be able to identify when you need to refer a patient with diabetic retinopathy, in the interests of the patient’s health and safety, and make appropriate referrals
  • To understand the risk factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy 
  • To be able recognise, evaluate and manage diabetic retinopathy presenting to optometric practice appropriately

Speakers

Wendy Newsom MCOptom

The presenter will initially set out the basics of how to apply OCT technology in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with macular disease. During this portion of the workshop the presenter will seek to engage delegates by using a quiz based on some real life cases covering the basics of OCT interpretation, where delegates can answer using voting pads. The group will then break up into smaller groups where they will work through cases with a facilitator. Finally, the presenter will summarise the learning points that have come up and take any additional questions. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrists

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how to use OCT images to detect significant abnormalities in macular disease (e.g. age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusion (RVO) and diabetic macular oedema (DMO)
  • To understand OCT images to aid in the recognition and management of macula disease
  • To be able to understand the treatment and follow-up of patients with macula disease.

Speakers

Tomas Burke

This workshop will provide an OSCE style assessment of communication in combination with a history and symptom taking exercise. Delegates will be required to complete a history and symptoms evaluation on a provided patient in sufficient detail to make a reasoned diagnosis within a time frame. There will be three different conditions for interpretation covering a varying severity / urgency. Delegates will have the opportunity to partake and observe to facilitate learning. Feedback will be given to assist in the development of communication skills and identify any actions to develop further. Techniques will be evaluated to explore the use of open and closed questioning and active listening. Reasoned diagnosis will only be possible with investigation of a full history and the ability to adopt alternative communication techniques i.e. non-verbal skills will also be explored.

NB if you attended this workshop at the 2017 conference then you will not be able to receive duplicate CET points.

Competencies covered: Communication and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives

  • To understand the importance of adapting communication language, style and technique to enable a relevant history, specific to an individual patient, to be obtained accurately and in sufficient detail to commence relevant investigations
  • To understand and identify significant, relevant symptoms and demonstrate the skills necessary to explore these elements to elicit further detail
  • To understand and demonstrate empathy and an ability to recognise emotion in a patient response, adapting communication to reflect an understanding of patient need and displaying reassurance where appropriate
  • To identify and explore the requirements to adopt non-verbal communication skills where necessary. To understand the need to communicate in a manner appropriate to the patient whilst maintaining depth and relevance of investigations.
  • To understand the theory surrounding risk factors for common ocular conditions and demonstrate an understanding of these factors through relevant line of questioning in history taking.

Speakers

Clair Bulpin MCOptom

Topics TBC

Glaucoma and dry eye, although at very opposite ends of the eye disease spectrum, can be more closely united than people might think. Any discomfort on the ocular surface can dramatically decrease a patient’s quality of life and ultimately lead to a reduced adherence to their glaucoma treatment. Studies have shown that around 50% of people with glaucoma may also have dry eye - the signs and symptoms of which are shown to be exacerbated when combined with the use of preserved eye drops. By the end of the session delegates will have a better appreciation of the extra care and support that is required for their glaucoma patients with regard to ocular surface examinations and how they can encourage then to adhere better to their glaucoma meds.

Speakers

Professor Christine Purslow MCOptom

This session will be delivered as a discussion workshop and will detail five unsual cases picked up in primary care practice which may or may not be sight or life threatening. 
The individual cases will be discussed along with options such as recording, monitoring, tele-medicin consult (which is NOT regerral) and referral. 
Cases may include choroidal folds, central serous retinopathy and others. 

Speakers

Nicholas Rumney FCOptom

More information on the content will follow. 

No description provided

10.05 AM

This lecture will provide information on current surgical treatments for glaucoma and how new 'Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery' (MIGS) differ from previous treatments. It will also inform optometrists on how to recognise the new devices when examining patients in practice.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease, Ocular examination and standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be aware of the currently available range of glaucoma surgical treatments
  • To understand how the new surgical glaucoma treatments (“Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery, ‘MIGS’) differ from previous surgical interventions
  • To be able to understand how to use a slit-lamp to assess the external eye and related structures when examining a patient with glaucoma and recognise any glaucoma surgery they have undergone.

Speakers

Gus Gazzard

The session will present a summary of the recent developments in full and partial thickness corneal graft surgery with particular emphasis on: 

  • the different types of corneal grafts and the patients they are indicated for 
  • the advantages of the newest surgical techniques and their inherent challenges
  • an outline of future treatment strategies for corneal conditions 

Speakers

Usman Hussain

This discussion workshop will cover an outline of the national diabetic eye screening programme in England, including the latest service standards, how images are graded, and referral criteria and options for treatment.
Cases will then be presented for grading and discussion, including an optometrists' responsibilities during a routine sight test.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To keep your knowledge of diabetic retinopathy screening up to date 
  • To be able to identify when you need to refer a patient with diabetic retinopathy, in the interests of the patient’s health and safety, and make appropriate referrals
  • To understand the risk factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy 
  • To be able recognise, evaluate and manage diabetic retinopathy presenting to optometric practice appropriately

Speakers

Wendy Newsom MCOptom

The presenter will initially set out the basics of how to apply OCT technology in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with macular disease. During this portion of the workshop the presenter will seek to engage delegates by using a quiz based on some real life cases covering the basics of OCT interpretation, where delegates can answer using voting pads. The group will then break up into smaller groups where they will work through cases with a facilitator. Finally, the presenter will summarise the learning points that have come up and take any additional questions. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrists

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how to use OCT images to detect significant abnormalities in macular disease (e.g. age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusion (RVO) and diabetic macular oedema (DMO)
  • To understand OCT images to aid in the recognition and management of macula disease
  • To be able to understand the treatment and follow-up of patients with macula disease.

Speakers

Tomas Burke

This workshop will provide an OSCE style assessment of communication in combination with a history and symptom taking exercise. Delegates will be required to complete a history and symptoms evaluation on a provided patient in sufficient detail to make a reasoned diagnosis within a time frame. There will be three different conditions for interpretation covering a varying severity / urgency. Delegates will have the opportunity to partake and observe to facilitate learning. Feedback will be given to assist in the development of communication skills and identify any actions to develop further. Techniques will be evaluated to explore the use of open and closed questioning and active listening. Reasoned diagnosis will only be possible with investigation of a full history and the ability to adopt alternative communication techniques i.e. non-verbal skills will also be explored.

 

NB if you attended this workshop at the 2017 conference then you will not be able to receive duplicate CET points.

Competencies covered: Communication and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives

  • To understand the importance of adapting communication language, style and technique to enable a relevant history, specific to an individual patient, to be obtained accurately and in sufficient detail to commence relevant investigations
  • To understand and identify significant, relevant symptoms and demonstrate the skills necessary to explore these elements to elicit further detail
  • To understand and demonstrate empathy and an ability to recognise emotion in a patient response, adapting communication to reflect an understanding of patient need and displaying reassurance where appropriate
  • To identify and explore the requirements to adopt non-verbal communication skills where necessary. To understand the need to communicate in a manner appropriate to the patient whilst maintaining depth and relevance of investigations.
  • To understand the theory surrounding risk factors for common ocular conditions and demonstrate an understanding of these factors through relevant line of questioning in history taking.

Speakers

Clair Bulpin MCOptom

Topics TBC

Scope's session will be titled 'Diagnosis or treatment of dry eye'. More information on the content will follow. 

ZEISS' session will be titled 'Are we seeing the full picture?' and will draw upon different approaches to retinal image capture. The value of wide field imaging will be discussed along with the benefits of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and OCT-Angiography. The benefits of these technologies to diagnose and manage, glaucoma and retinal patients, this will be delivered using clinical case studies.

These sessions will be presented on the sponsor's exhibition stands. 

Dry eye disease is a common disorder of the tear film caused by decreased tear production or increased evaporation and presents with a wide variety of signs and symptoms. This workshop will discuss the signs and symptoms of dry eye, including the diagnosis of either aqueous deficiency or evaporative dry eye and the latest treatments available, including IPL therapy for meibomian gland dysfunction. Guided discussion based on patient cases will provide relevant information to help you recognise dry eye disease and support your patients - ultimately increasing their quality of life.

Speakers

Laura Pigula

Rebecca Stoner MCOptom

Historically, keeping patients happy as they become presbyopic hasn’t been easy. With presbyopic patients most frequently citing poor vision as the reason for discontinuing wear, what can we do to make these patients happy again? This multi-station discussion workshop, featuring topics on the aging tear film, pupils and ocular dominance, will help to equip you with the skills you need to maximise success for your presbyopic patients. 

Speakers

Dr Rachel Hiscox MCOptom

No description provided

11.05 AM

No description provided

11.30 AM

This lecture will cover all aspects involved in the investigation, diagnosis and management of patients presenting with anterior uveitis. It will cover the value of taking a detailed history and building a rapport with patients and the ocular examination including the importance and relevance of clinical signs. The lecture will also explain the patterns of uveitis and how this affects the pharmaceutical management of the condition.

Competencies covered:

Optometrist: Communication, Ocular Disease and Ocular Examination

Therapeutic optometrist: Knowledge, Options and Safe

Target group: Optometrist and Therapeutic optometrist

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the value of a detailed history taking and building a rapport with patients to be able to elicit the symptoms suggestive of anterior uveitis
  • To understand how to assess the external eye and the anterior chamber for signs of anterior uveitis
  • To be able to understand the investigation and presenting patterns of anterior uveitis to make a differential diagnosis and refer appropriately
  • To gain an improved understanding of the patterns of anterior uveitis, its natural progression and severity
  • To understand the value of a detailed history taking and building a rapport with patients to be able to elicit the factors relevant to patients presenting with suspect anterior uveitis
  • To improve the understanding of the available drug treatments, their indications and contra-indications and the limitations for use with patients with anterior uveitis
  • To understand your limitations when managing patients with anterior uveitis and when referral may be necessary.

Speakers

Professor Philip Murray

The examination of young patients can present a challenge even to experienced optometrists. In this session, key techniques and tips in examining children will be presented in support of key areas of competence for optometrists. In addition, through the use of specific case examples (i.e. patients with strabismus and/or amblyopia), the presenter will guide the audience on management of common problems of binocular vision in children. The presentation is based on up-to-date research in the investigation and management of vision problems in children and many years of personal experience in paediatric optometry.

Competencies covered: Assessment of visual function, Binocular vision and Communication. 

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To be able to communicate effectively in order to elicit correct and pertinent information in the assessment of children’s vision 
  • To understand the correct use and interpretation of key tests of the assessment of visual function in children including assessment of binocular function 
  • To understand the correct management of children presenting with more common anomalies of binocular vision namely amblyopia and strabismus 

 

Speakers

Professor John Siderov MCOptom

This discussion workshop will use a number of case studies from situations within the domiciliary sector. Delegates will be encouraged to discuss their own practice and how this correlates to the GOC Standards of Practice and their professional responsibilities. 

The cases will include:
- issues of consent and disclosure of information. 
- situations where you are faced with a potentially urgent referral and the investigation of symptoms drawing upon the College of Optometrists' Clinical Management Guidelines and local referral practices. 
- debate on regulatory matters including GOS entitlement, delegatable functions and the Opticians Act. 
- dispensing of spectacles/low vision aids.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand your legal obligations in relation to consent, including the difference in the provision of consent for children, young people and vulnerable people
  • To understand how to investigate various patient cases presenting with urgent symptoms and how your investigation may vary in a domiciliary environment
  • To understand legal and regulatory matters concerning domiciliary sight tests and delegated functions
  • To ensure that domiciliary patients are fully informed and understand their options when dispensing spectacles and low vision aids.

Speakers

Matthew Burford MCOptom

Practitioners working in High Street practice need to respond to the needs of their patients who have reduced vision; solving problems where possible, but also realising that the patient with low vision may have wider needs.

This workshop is aimed at delegates who are looking to gain more confidence in prescribing low vision aids. Participants will gain an understanding of the basic principles of assessing and providing for the magnification needs of their low vision patients.
During the workshop practitioners will get an opportunity to use and evaluate the benefits of different optical magnifiers. 

Target group: Optometrist and Dispensing Optician

Competencies covered:

Optometrist: Communication, optical applicances and standards of practice 

Dispensing Optician: Communication, low vision and standards of practice 

Learning Objectives: 

  • To improve the ability to balance the needs and aspirations of the patient with the possibilities provided by their vision and how to explain the limitations to them
  • To enable optometrists to evaluate and ensure they are considering the social as well as optical needs of their visually impaired patients and be able to work together with other healthcare professional ensuring the patients best interests
  • To improve the understanding of the range of low vision aids available and how to assess and provide the best solution for a visually impaired patient
  • To improve the understanding of the range of complex low vision aids available and how to assess and provide the best solution for a visually impaired patient
  • To enable dispensing opticians to evlauate and ensure they are considering the social as well as optical needs of their visually impaired patients and be able to work together with other healthcare professionals ensuring the patients best interests 

Speakers

Andrew Miller MCOptom

No description provided

Speakers

Sarah Farrant MCOptom

Topics TBC

Are your toric lenses fitting comfortably, without disorientating? Toric wearers over-index in contact lens wearer drop-outs, most commonly citing poor vision as the reason for discontinuation. This multi-station discussion workshop will encourage you think about the best ways to manage patients with astigmatism in practice, with respect to both toric design and material properties. 

Speakers

Dr Rachel Hiscox MCOptom

This discussion workshop is provided by the Optical Consumer Complaints Service (OCCS).

This session will use cases that challenge delegates to develop strategies in handling some of the most common issues we deal with at the OCCS. It will encourage clinicians to apologise and manage complaints with empathy and also to develop effective written communication on a complaint. The cases focus on complaint handling, duty of candour and duty of consent. Delegates will be able to create an individual action plan to develop a model for handling complaints in practice as well as reinforcing the need for reflective practice. 

This discussion workshop introduces four film-based patient and practitioner scenarios allowing delegates to consider how best to understand their patients’ digital lifestyles and consider suitable diagnostic tests. Delegates will also discuss possible ocular complications and considerations as well as confer appropriate advice and management options that are available for a range of patient types and preferences today.

Speakers

Gurraj Jabbal MCOptom

No description provided

12.30 PM

No description provided

1.35 PM

No description provided

1.40 PM

No description provided

Speakers

Dr Andrew Bastawrous

Topics TBC

No description provided

3.15 PM

No description provided

3.45 PM

This session will cover:

  • classification of common surgical vitreomacular disorders
  • the salient clinical and OCT diagnostic features of and developing a systematic approach to diagnosing the various vitremacular disorders
  • how to develop a logical and systemic approach to hospital referral of patients with vitreomacular disorders and improve the community management of VMT disorders to be better able to inform and counsel patients with these conditions as required, including at initial presentation

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

This seminar will describe the joys and woes of fitting contact lenses to children of all ages, with reflections from a typical hospital optometry practice, directed to all optometrists involved in or considering fitting contact lenses to children. It will discuss:
  • methods to examine the young patient's eyes
  • what to expect from children wearing contact lenses
  • red flags and danger signs

Speakers

Dr Jon Whittle

This interactive workshop for OCT beginners will provide the opportunity for delegates to learn the capabilities of anterior segment imaging with the OCT, interpret the imaging itself and how to implement these anterior scans into everyday clinical practice. 

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able interpret anterior chamber angle imaging with the OCT in order to explain to patients the implications of their physiological eye condition 
  • To be able to utilise anterior segment OCT to measure corneal curvature and assess its regularity 
  • To be able to integrate findings from anterior chamber imaging to evaluate patient risk factors for narrow or closed angle glaucoma and refer accordingly 

Speakers

Adam Wannell MCOptom

Ever since the NICE guidelines defined ocular hypertension and clarified a pathway for the detection and management of patients with raised intraocular pressure (IOP), there has been an increasing need for optometrists to be able to accurately measure IOP using contact methods. This skills workshop will be divided into stations that will help to develop the skills of practitioners in:

(1) safely and correctly setting-up a Goldmann contact tonometer, including calibration checks
(2) performing safety checks pre and post-procedure, selecting and using appropriate anaesthetics to then perform the technique and obtaining an accurate measurement with the Goldmann tonometer
(3) through the use of case scenarios, delegates will be able to interpret contact tonometry results, with particular emphasis on management of patients at risk of and/or diagnosed with glaucoma.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target Group: Optometrist

Learning Objectives:

  • To safely set-up and use a Goldmann applanation contact tonometer to measure intraocular pressure, and accurately interpret the results
  • To safely use ocular anaesthetics to aid ocular examination when performing Goldmann applanation contact tonometry
  • To evaluate glaucoma risk factors including intraocular pressure, to detect glaucoma changes and refer accordingly

Speakers

Dr Navneet Gupta MCOptom

This workshop will help delegates identify and examine those that need eye care in hard to reach groups such as the elderly, those with reduced mobility and communication difficulties, the homeless and in locations such as care homes and schools. Using smartphone technology (downloadable during the session) and portable devices, patients can be screened and identified quickly and those that need further investigation targerted to follow up with the relevant practitioner. 

Speakers

Karen Sparrow FCOptom

Topics TBC

This is a session designed to take the key findings of the latest seminal publication on dry eye, and translate them into how your clinical practice in dry eye management can advance and modernise. If you are curious about evidence-based practice in this field but simply don’t have time to read 400 pages for yourself, this is the session for you!

Speakers

Sarah Farrant MCOptom

More information on the content will follow. 

This session focuses on the steps required to embrace myopia management in practice and will include:

  • A brief review of myopia prevalence and future prevalence predictions
  • Communication guidance to discuss myopia management options with parent and child
  • Parent and child testimonials on their experience with soft contact lens
  • Management of myopia application and removal strategies for young wearers
  • Aftercare management plan.

Speakers

Shail Patel

No description provided

4.50 PM

This session will be some extra time for Kam Balaggan to discuss further content following his lecture. 

Please note this session will not have any CET points. 

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

This lecture will cover: 

  • Investigation of papilloedema and diagnosis of IIH
  • Fulminant visual loss
  • Treatment options
  • Monitoring 

Speakers

Dr Alex Sinclair

This interactive workshop for OCT beginners will provide the opportunity for delegates to learn the capabilities of anterior segment imaging with the OCT, interpret the imaging itself and how to implement these anterior scans into everyday clinical practice. 

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able interpret anterior chamber angle imaging with the OCT in order to explain to patients the implications of their physiological eye condition 
  • To be able to utilise anterior segment OCT to measure corneal curvature and assess its regularity 
  • To be able to integrate findings from anterior chamber imaging to evaluate patient risk factors for narrow or closed angle glaucoma and refer accordingly 

Speakers

Adam Wannell MCOptom

Ever since the NICE guidelines defined ocular hypertension and clarified a pathway for the detection and management of patients with raised intraocular pressure (IOP), there has been an increasing need for optometrists to be able to accurately measure IOP using contact methods. This skills workshop will be divided into stations that will help to develop the skills of practitioners in:

(1) safely and correctly setting-up a Goldmann contact tonometer, including calibration checks
(2) performing safety checks pre and post-procedure, selecting and using appropriate anaesthetics to then perform the technique and obtaining an accurate measurement with the Goldmann tonometer
(3) through the use of case scenarios, delegates will be able to interpret contact tonometry results, with particular emphasis on management of patients at risk of and/or diagnosed with glaucoma.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target Group: Optometrist

Learning Objectives:

  • To safely set-up and use a Goldmann applanation contact tonometer to measure intraocular pressure, and accurately interpret the results
  • To safely use ocular anaesthetics to aid ocular examination when performing Goldmann applanation contact tonometry
  • To evaluate glaucoma risk factors including intraocular pressure, to detect glaucoma changes and refer accordingly

Speakers

Dr Navneet Gupta MCOptom

The discussion workshop will look at cases presenting with symptoms that require investigation and possible urgent or emergency referral. The cases will allow clinicians to question urgent referrals and ensure they are referred to the correct department in a hospital, in an appropriate timescale. This will result in enhance cared for the patient and increase the optometrists credibility with other healthcare professionals.

The workshop will include discussion around the importance of writing a good referral letter, and how communication is essential when passing over care to other clinicians.

Cases will include commonly presenting conditions such as those suggesting a possible retinal detachment and glaucoma cases.

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to understand conditions and symptoms which require referral to emergency A&E
  • To understand how to interpret signs and symptoms for conditions which require urgent care but not referral to A&E and how to manage appropriately in an optometric setting
  • To understand how to write an effective referral letter in urgent and emergency cases

 

Speakers

Rakesh Kapoor FCOptom

Topics TBC

No description provided

 

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