Optometry Tomorrow 2019

Date:

24 - 25 February 2019 Add to calendar

Location:

Hilton Birmingham Metropole, The NEC Birmingham, Pendigo Way, Marston Green, Birmingham B40 1PP

Conference CET 16

Programme

Click here to download a PDF version of the programme

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You must book a minimum of 8 sessions for this day.

8.00 AM

No description provided

9.15 AM

No description provided

9.35 AM

This lecture will update optometrists on current surgical treatments for glaucoma. It will discuss current clinical trials and possible future treatments. The session will cover techniques such as 'Minimal Invasive Glaucoma Surgery' and other surgical techniques discussing the benefits and downsides for patients. This will enable optometrists to understand and explain to patients some of the procedures they may undergo.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Standards of practice 

Target audience: Optometrist 

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of glaucoma and its treatments and so to be able to explain the condition and management to patients more effectively 
  • To understand current and possible future treatments for glaucoma with their benefits and potential complications 
  • To understand recent developments and clinical trials in surgical treatments for glaucoma and the impact on the management of glaucoma patients

Speakers

Keith Barton

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This session will explore the benefits of paediatric contact lens fitting, from the point of view of the child, the parents and the practice. Compliance will be addressed, as well as the need to modify the approach when dealing with children and their parents. The fitting process will be discussed, with handy tips on adapting the usual routine for different age groups. 

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice, Contact Lenses

Target group: Optometrist, Dispensing Optician, Contact Lens Optician

Learning objectives:

  • To improve the communication when discussing contact lenses with children and their parents and about how to wear them safely.
  • To learn how to encourage an honest and open dialogue with children and their parents when discussing the options of contact lens wear
  • To improve the understanding of the fitting and the most appropriate contact lens options for children, taking into account factors such as prescription and lifestyle.
  • To improve the communication when discussing contact lenses with children and their parents and about how to wear them safely.
  • To improve the communication when discussing contact lenses with children and their parents and about how to wear them safely.
  • To learn how to encourage an honest and open dialogue with children and their parents when discussing the options of contact lens wear
  • To learn how to encourage an honest and open dialogue with children and their parents when discussing the options of contact lens wear
  • To improve the understanding of the fitting and the most appropriate contact lens options for children, taking into account factors such as prescription and lifestyle.
  • To improve the understanding of the fitting of the most appropriate contact lens options for children, taking into account factors such as prescription and lifestyle.

Speakers

Wendy Sethi

Contact Lens Consultant
The Wendy House (UK) Ltd

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 

Speakers

Dr Irene Ctori MCOptom

Council Member and Lecturer
The College of Optometrists and City, University of London

In the UK there is an estimated 7,300 new cases of retinal detachment every year and many patients will present with flashes and floaters to Optometrists in the primary care setting. The biggest cause of a retinal detachment is from a posterior vitreous detachment which occurs mostly between the 5th and 7th decade of life. This skills workshop will supplement the previous lecture on PVDs and retinal tears by further focusing on the practical and systematic approach to the assessment and management of the patient who presents with flashes and floaters. Particular emphasis will be made on the how to properly perform dynamic vitreous and Weiss ring assessments in order to detect PVDs and Schaffer’s sign. Most of the workshop will be dedicated to practicing the essential practical skills required specifically for peripheral retinal examination to detect and not miss retinal breaks in all patients. Discussion will also focus on how to differentiate the various types of retinal breaks (including acute versus chronic breaks, atrophic round holes, horseshoe tears, operculated tears, retinal dialyses, and giant retinal tears) and how to differentiate those breaks that require urgent treatment from those that can merely be observed. Optometrists will have opportunity to examine several patients with signs of PVD and retinal detachments and so should feel confident in investigating and appropriately managing patients that present with symptoms of flashes and floaters after this workshop.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination 

Target audience: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the advice given when patients present with flashes and floaters, so optometrists are able to communicate appropriate advice and explain the referral pathway 
  • To understand the risk factors for Retinal Detachment and PVD 
  • To be able to develop a management plan for the investigation of the patient with symtoms of retinal detachment by using dilation, direct slit lamp and volk examination ensuring appropriate referral
  • To improve the skills when examining patients with an indirect ophthalmoscope looking for signs of a retinal detachment

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

Consultant in vitreoretinal surgery, medical retina and cataracts
Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary

“Dry eye disease (DED) affects hundreds of millions of people throughout the world and is one of the most frequent causes of patient visits to eye care practitioners. It is a symptomatic disease, characterised by a vicious cycle of tear film instability and hyperosmolarity, which leads to increased ocular surface inflammation, damage and neurosensory abnormalities. Moderate to severe DED is associated with significant pain, limitations in performing daily activities, reduced vitality, poor general health and often depression” 1

It is beyond the scope of this workshop to discuss in depth the causes, investigative techniques and management of dry eye, therefore it will give a brief over view of the aetiology of dry eye and particularly focus on the options currently available for Step 1 management and treatment of DED as laid out in the TFOS DEWS II report.

This workshop will consider the following:
- Risk factors
- Causes of evaporative dry eye
- Patient education
- Lid hygiene
- Ocular lubricants
- Dietary advice
- What do you use? When? Why?

After a short introductory presentation, delegates will work in small groups discussing the advantages and disadvantages of the various products currently available to eye care practitioners and how they will apply this knowledge to patient case based scenarios.
Delegates will be asked to consider the following for each product group:
- Key ingredients
- Target area
- Ease of use

Products will be categorised as follows:

- Lid hygiene: foams, washes, lid scrubs and wipes
- Ocular lubricants: eye drops, gels and ointments
- Dietary advice, supplementation and medication as well as contraindications

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Communication, Standards of practice and Ocular disease 

Therapeutic optometrist: Knowledge, Options and Share decision making 

Dispensing optician: Communication, Standards of practice and Ccular abnormalities 

Contact lens optician: Communication, Standards of practice and Contact lenses

Target audience: Optometrist, Therapeutic optometrist, Dispensing optician and Conctact lens optician 

Learning objectives: 

  • An awareness of the impact dry eye symptoms can have on quality of life 
  • An ability to advise patients on dietary and lifestyle issues relating to dry ere
  • An ability to manage dry eye disease more effectively in line with current best practice and reseach 
  • An ability to advise appropriate treatments for dry eye and select eyedrops in a more targeted and effective manner
  • To understand the options available to patients in the management of dry eye and the pros and cons of any treatements offered

1 TFOS DEWS II Report Executive Summary The Ocular Surface xxx (2017) 1-11

Speakers

Claire Mallon MCOptom

Senior Clinical Teacher in Optometry
The University of Manchester

This therapeutic seminar will be presented as a power point presentation which will describe eye conditions where systemic medication is required for treatment. This will be based on cases seen by the presenter whilst working in a large, multi-disciplinary eye hospital. The seminar will cover eye conditions that may benefit from treatment with the following systemic medications: tetracyclines, corticosteroids, NSAID’s, antivirals and anti-glaucoma medications. The seminar will concentrate on the therapeutic management and treatment regimes including the benefits, cautions and contra-indications of those agents. The presentation will include up-to date evidence based treatment options. It will cover the competencies of clinical and pharmaceutical knowledge, establishing appropriate treatment options, communicating treatment options (and their potential side effects) to patients and prescribing safely. The interaction that is necessary with Consultant ophthalmologists when dealing with these conditions will also be discussed. The presentation will also cover the relevant guidance that is available nationally to aid in the management of these patients.

Speakers

Amanda Harding MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital

Swept Source OCT utilising long wavelength light has been shown to improve visualisation of the vitreous structures and the choroid, along with the ability to scan through cataracts and haemorrhages, but also enables clearer visualisation of retinal layers. This interactive discussion workshop will provide an insight to Swept Source OCT and allow greater understanding of the differences between spectral domain and Swept Source OCT technology, and how this impacts scan speed, signal to noise ratio and visibility of deeper retinal and choroidal structures. Delegates will understand how tissue penetration varies with light source wavelength, and how devices with 1um light sources are better able to penetrate the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid, than 840nm light sources. There will be opportunity to discuss real clinical cases in which Swept Source is particularly advantageous.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Laura Pigula

Clinical Affairs Specialist
Topcon (Great Britain) Medical Limited

No description provided

10.40 AM

The CET will start with a description of the International Headache Society classification of headaches. The most common and the most serious types of headaches will be summarised, to aid optometrists and DO's in the recognition of these types of headaches. The presentation will stress the importance of recognising and referring headaches that are suspicious of serious pathology. The role of the clinicians in the management of some forms of headache will also be summarised.

Target group: Optometrist and Dispensing optician

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Communication and Ocular disease 

Dispensing optician: Communication and Ocular abnormalities 

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve understanding of the role of good symptom and history taking in the diagnosis of headaches
  • To assist practitioners in making appropriate decision about referral criteria for headaches
  • To improve the recognition of headaches suggestive of neurological conditions

Speakers

Professor Bruce Evans FCOptom

Director of Research
Institute of Optometry

This seminar will be lead by an optometrist, an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer and will involve a patient who is visually impaired as a result of AMD. 

The patient will talk about living with AMD and the impact this has on their day-to-day life whilst the Liason Officer will be speaking about the experiences of patients' they work with.

The session will also cover recent research conducted in the Crabb Lab at City, University of London on real-life visual function (face-recognition, visual search and mobility) in patients with dry AMD. It will discuss the symptoms reported by people with dry AMD, in particular relating to how their vision looks and appears in the real world.

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease 

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of the visual impact of AMD and so to be able to explain and reassure appropriately these effects to patients.
  • To improve the understanding of the real-life visual function of patients with AMD and so to be able to advise and support patients with AMD more effectively
  • To improve the understanding of the symptoms experienced by patients with AMD and the impact on their vision and so to be able to investigate these more effectively
  • To improve the management and advice given to patients with AMD by understanding their real-life visual function 

Speakers

Dr Deanna Taylor MCOptom

Post Doctoral Research Fellow
City, University of London

Jane Johns

Patient with AMD

Vanessa Camp

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 

Speakers

Dr Irene Ctori MCOptom

Council Member and Lecturer
The College of Optometrists and City, University of London

In the UK there is an estimated 7,300 new cases of retinal detachment every year and many patients will present with flashes and floaters to Optometrists in the primary care setting. The biggest cause of a retinal detachment is from a posterior vitreous detachment which occurs mostly between the 5th and 7th decade of life. This skills workshop will supplement the previous lecture on PVDs and retinal tears by further focusing on the practical and systematic approach to the assessment and management of the patient who presents with flashes and floaters. Particular emphasis will be made on the how to properly perform dynamic vitreous and Weiss ring assessments in order to detect PVDs and Schaffer’s sign. Most of the workshop will be dedicated to practicing the essential practical skills required specifically for peripheral retinal examination to detect and not miss retinal breaks in all patients. Discussion will also focus on how to differentiate the various types of retinal breaks (including acute versus chronic breaks, atrophic round holes, horseshoe tears, operculated tears, retinal dialyses, and giant retinal tears) and how to differentiate those breaks that require urgent treatment from those that can merely be observed. Optometrists will have opportunity to examine several patients with signs of PVD and retinal detachments and so should feel confident in investigating and appropriately managing patients that present with symptoms of flashes and floaters after this workshop.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination 

Target audience: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the advice given when patients present with flashes and floaters, so optometrists are able to communicate appropriate advice and explain the referral pathway 
  • To understand the risk factors for Retinal Detachment and PVD 
  • To be able to develop a management plan for the investigation of the patient with symtoms of retinal detachment by using dilation, direct slit lamp and volk examination ensuring appropriate referral
  • To improve the skills when examining patients with an indirect ophthalmoscope looking for signs of a retinal detachment

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

Consultant in vitreoretinal surgery, medical retina and cataracts
Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary

“Dry eye disease (DED) affects hundreds of millions of people throughout the world and is one of the most frequent causes of patient visits to eye care practitioners. It is a symptomatic disease, characterised by a vicious cycle of tear film instability and hyperosmolarity, which leads to increased ocular surface inflammation, damage and neurosensory abnormalities. Moderate to severe DED is associated with significant pain, limitations in performing daily activities, reduced vitality, poor general health and often depression” 1

It is beyond the scope of this workshop to discuss in depth the causes, investigative techniques and management of dry eye, therefore it will give a brief over view of the aetiology of dry eye and particularly focus on the options currently available for Step 1 management and treatment of DED as laid out in the TFOS DEWS II report.

This workshop will consider the following:
- Risk factors
- Causes of evaporative dry eye
- Patient education
- Lid hygiene
- Ocular lubricants
- Dietary advice
- What do you use? When? Why?

After a short introductory presentation, delegates will work in small groups discussing the advantages and disadvantages of the various products currently available to eye care practitioners and how they will apply this knowledge to patient case based scenarios.
Delegates will be asked to consider the following for each product group:
- Key ingredients
- Target area
- Ease of use

Products will be categorised as follows:

- Lid hygiene: foams, washes, lid scrubs and wipes
- Ocular lubricants: eye drops, gels and ointments
- Dietary advice, supplementation and medication as well as contraindications

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Communication, Standards of practice and Ocular disease 

Therapeutic optometrist: Knowledge, Options and Share decision making 

Dispensing optician: Communication, Standards of practice and Ccular abnormalities 

Contact lens optician: Communication, Standards of practice and Contact lenses

Target audience: Optometrist, Therapeutic optometrist, Dispensing optician and Conctact lens optician 

Learning objectives: 

  • An awareness of the impact dry eye symptoms can have on quality of life 
  • An ability to advise patients on dietary and lifestyle issues relating to dry ere
  • An ability to manage dry eye disease more effectively in line with current best practice and reseach 
  • An ability to advise appropriate treatments for dry eye and select eyedrops in a more targeted and effective manner
  • To understand the options available to patients in the management of dry eye and the pros and cons of any treatements offered
1 TFOS DEWS II Report Executive Summary The Ocular Surface xxx (2017) 1-11
 

Speakers

Claire Mallon MCOptom

Senior Clinical Teacher in Optometry
The University of Manchester

This seminar uses real cases of patients with glaucoma, suspect glaucoma and ocular hypertension, together with a detailed overview of high quality evidence sources to support prescribing practice. There will be an emphasis on how to confidently select trustworthy and unbiased evidence and how to avoid sources with a high risk of bias.

The seminar will present case studies from clinical practice to allow delegates to understand the principles of evidence-based glaucoma decision-making, together with some of the common management challenges. This will include when not to prescribe, and when to refer to a more qualified practitioner e.g. to consider glaucoma surgery. Different risk levels will be discussed from ocular hypertension through to advanced or progressive glaucoma.

The session will inform delegates about how to ensure that their patients are being safely managed by an appropriately qualified person, which is determined by the patient’s diagnosis and clinical risk. Delegates will appreciate which of the recognised qualifications are needed to diagnose and manage ocular hypertension, suspect glaucoma and glaucoma.

Competencies covered:

Optometrist: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Therapeutic optometrist:  Knowledge, Options, Safe

Target group: Optometrist, Therapeutic optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to identify and use high quality evidence to inform management for patients with glaucoma, suspect glaucoma and ocular hypertension 
  • To know how to approach some of the clinical decision-making decisions and challenges in the management of patients with glaucoma and glaucoma-related conditions. This will include deciding when therapeutic prescribing is indicated, and when it is not 
  • To be able to ensure that a patient with glaucoma, suspect glaucoma or ocular hypertension is being seen safely by an appropriately qualified practitioner in an appropriate setting 

 

Speakers

Angela Whitaker MCOptom

Senior Lecturer
Cardiff University

Learn how to successfully implement myopia management in your practice. Get practical advice and tips on what equipment you need, how to communicate with parents and how to train your staff for practice success.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Dr Keyur Patel

Independent Optometrist
Tompkins, Knight & Son Optometrists

No description provided

Insights show that the average age for starting contact lens wear in the UK is 20, yet we know that for the younger generation contact lenses can enhance confidence and improve lifestyle. In this interactive discussion workshop, we will examine how subtle changes to your communication with younger patients can make a big difference in the patient’s experience.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Clair Bulpin MCOptom

Optometrist

No description provided

11.40 AM

No description provided

12.05 PM

This session will update practitioners on the current evidence for myopia management treatments, including orthokeratology, soft myopia-management contact lenses, and atropine eye drops. The speakers will highlight the current limitations in our knowledge, not least the lack of data in children of European ancestry, the lack of long-term efficacy data, and the risks associated with treatment. They will also discuss the recent College of Optometrists’ consensus statement on myopia management, and planned guidance in this area from the College.

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Communication, Optical appliances, Contact lenses and Ocular disease 

Dispensing optician: Communication, Optical appliances and Ocular abnormalities 

Target audience: Optometrist and Dispensing optician 

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand the current state of evidence regarding myopia management treatments and so to be able to explain effectively to patients and their families.
  • To appreciate the risks and responsibilities associated with prescribing spectacle lenses for myopia management therapies
  • To appreciate the risks and responsibilities associated with prescribing contact lenses for myopia management therapies
  • To understand the evidence, the limitations of current knowledge and the unanswered questions around myopia and myopia management

Speakers

Professor Chris Hammond

Frost Professor of Ophthalmology & Consultant Ophthalmologist
King's College London and St Thomas' Hospital

Dr Nicola Logan MCOptom

Reader in Optometry & Physiological Optics
Aston University

Professor Kathryn Saunders FCOptom

Professor of Optometry and Vision Science
Ulster University

Evidence-based practice is the “integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values.” When making a treatment/management decision with their patient, healthcare providers integrate their clinical expertise, the preferences and values of the patient and the best available research evidence in the process of decision-making. This session will use clinical examples to emphasise the importance of evidence synthesis in the form of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It will also describe strategies that can be used to access open access databases for finding reliable pre-appraised evidence.

Competencies covered: Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist, Dispensing optician

Learning objectives: 

  • To be able to understand the process of identifying and critically appraising research evidence, including that provided by your patients
  • To understand the importance of evidence synthesis in healthcare and how to apply it to the care provided to patients
  • To have knowledge of open access resources to support evidence-based practice and so to be able to give balanced advice to patients


 

Speakers

Professor John Lawrenson FCOptom

Professor of Clinical Visual Science
City, University of London

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more

This workshop is for experienced OCT users and will discuss OCT images of the anterior eye. Delegates will look at real world patient cases, with active or diagnosed ocular disease.

Target audience: Optometrist

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and Ocular disease 

Learning objectives: 

  • To refresh experienced users on OCT techniques and the interpretation of artefacts when viewing the images
  • To enhance the skills of experienced users on interpreting signs seen on OCT images of the anterior eye
  • To improve the decision making of experienced users of OCT by increasing the understanding of ocular abnormalities of the anterior eye and considering when referral is required.

Speakers

Professor Nicholas Rumney FCOptom

Chairman and Therapeutic Optometrist
BBR Optometry Ltd

This interactive workshop will enable optometrists to develop their hands-on skills in gonioscopy. There will be an introduction to the basic principles of gonioscopy followed by an opportunity to practice on patients. Particular attention will be made towards differentiating between open and closed angle glaucoma, as well as looking for key signs of pathology identified on gonioscopy, This will help optometrists improve the range of services they can offer to their patients and work towards engaging in glaucoma enhanced schemes. 

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to use a slit lamp and gonioscopy lens to examine the anterior chamber 
  • To be able to differentiate between open and closed angle glaucoma using gonioscopy 
  • To be able to recognise abnormalities identified through gonioscopy and understand when to refer 

Speakers

Patrick Gunn MCOptom

Principal Optometrist - Training and Education
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital

Practitioners working in High Street practice need to be responsive to the requirements of their patients who have reduced vision. 

This interactive workshop is aimed at optometrists who are looking to gain more confidence in managing and supporting their patients with visual impairment. The session will allow practitioners to learn about some of the mainstream apps and technology that allow people with sight loss to support themselves more independently.

Participants will gain an understanding of some simple technology that can help to provide for some of the communication and mobility needs of their low vision patients. Delegates will gain a better understanding of both the needs of people with sight loss and how technology is increasingly being used to meet these needs.

Competencies covered:

Optometrist: Optical Appliances and Standards of practice

Dispensing opticians: Low vision and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist, Dispensing Optician

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand how modern mainstream technology can be used as an effective low vision aid.
  • To understand how technology can be used to allow visually impaired patients better access to printed and other information they require.
  • To better understand the rapidly changing landscape of accessible technology and some of the opportunities these devices create for people with visual impairment

 

Speakers

Andrew Miller MCOptom

Lead Optometrist
Focus Birmingham

This session will utilise case based learning. Four clinical cases related to symptomatic dry eye will be presented and critically appraised. The differential diagnosis, management options will be discussed and evaluated.  Current guidelines and research evidence will be considered in each case along with newer future treatment options. 
In addition to the cases the session will provide a broad overview of the definitions and classification of dry, its epidemiology, diagnostic methods and its management options at the start of the session.  
 

Speakers

Professor Fiona Carley

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital

This lecture plus discussion workshop focuses on how near vision assessment is currently taught in universities and used in sight examinations. It will also look at the effect of the increase of near vision targets as well as changing distances.
This is to aide the delegates in feeling comfortable and confident in understanding enhanced single vision lenses as well as recommending to their patients. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Andy Hepworth

Professional Relations Manager
Essilor Ltd

Professor Leon Davies FCOptom

Head of Optometry
Aston University

It’s a super challenge! There are ten patients in your waiting room needing your expert diagnosis but, you only have an hour left of the day. That’s not the worst news either; they are all over 40!  Can you handle the heat? In this fast-paced, interactive discussion workshop you will work alongside your peers as a group to diagnose and manage 10 different patients, with a wide range of symptoms.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Sarah Long

Professional Affairs Consultant
Johnson & Johnson Vision

No description provided

1.05 PM

No description provided

2.05 PM

This lecture will discuss how to investigate suspicious lumps and bumps on the eyelids in optometric practice to differentiate between those that can be managed in practice and those that need referring to the hospital eye service. It will cover relevant points in history taking, how to examine the lids, how to recognise potentially malignant lesions and when referral is required.

Competencies covered: Ocular Examination, Ocular Disease, Standards of Practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand how to systematically examine the eyelids with a slit lamp to investigate eyelid pathology
  • To be able to recognise the various types of eyelid pathology and differentiate between benign and malignant lesions and so give appropriate advice to a patient
  • To be able to understand when referral is required for suspicous eyelid lumps and bumps to the Hospital Eye Service

Speakers

Raj Das-Bhaumik

Consultant Ophthalmic and Ophthalmic Plastic Surgeon
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This seminar describes the use of OCT in glaucoma diagnosis and management and a deeper look into its use in alternative models of patient care such as 'virtual Clinics'. It considers the benefits and limitations in detection and monitoring of glaucoma patients.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Examination, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning ojectives:

  • To understand the influence of OCT and other investigations and their use in 'virtual clinics' involving various colleagues in the healthcare professions.
  • To understand the practical uses of OCT in examining the optic disc and in glaucoma detection and monitoring 
  • To understand the pitfalls and limitations of OCT in diagnosing glaucoma and progression and so to refer appropriately.

Speakers

Karl Mercieca

Consultant Ophthalmologist and Glaucoma Surgeon
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, U.K.

Please do not book on to this session unless you are an experienced OCT user.

The presenter will initially set out the basics of how to apply OCT technology in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with macular disease. During this portion of the workshop the presenter will seek to engage delegates by using a quiz based on some real life cases covering the basics of OCT interpretation, where delegates can answer using voting pads. The group will then break up into smaller groups where they will work through cases with a facilitator. Finally, the presenter will summarise the learning points that have come up and take any additional questions. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrists

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how to use OCT images to detect significant abnormalities in macular disease (e.g. age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusion (RVO) and diabetic macular oedema (DMO)
  • To understand OCT images to aid in the recognition and management of macula disease
  • To be able to understand the treatment and follow-up of patients with macula disease.

Speakers

Tomas Burke

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Bristol Eye Hospital

This skills workshop will focus on the symptoms patients with accommodative dysfunction complain of. Delegates will learn how to assess accommodative facility and MEM retinoscopy and interpret the results. Delegates will learn how to formulate a management plan for the patient including spectacles and appropriate vision therapy.

Competencies covered: 

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand the symptoms commonly associated with accommodative dysfunction 
  • To have the ability to measure accommodation by objective and subjective means, and interpret the results
  • To be able to examine and manage patients with learning disabilities presenting with accommodative dysfunction 
  • To be able to manage patients presenting with accommodative and binocular vision dysfunction

Speakers

Dr Catherine Porter MCOptom

Senior Lecturer in Optometry
University of Manchester

This is an introductory workshop to help delegates gain knowledge and hands-on experience of the Headset binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy technique. There will be hints and tips on when to use this technique over other ophthalmoscopy methods and how to get the best view of the fundus using the most appropriate indirect lenses. We will consider how to record the findings and how to explain the technique to the patient. Discussion will be had around use of ophthalmic drugs and gaining consent for carrying out the investigation/assessment.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to explain the use of the headset BIO assessment and reassure the patient if they are unsure or apprehensive 
  • To be able to carry out the headset BIO technique to assess the fundus, taking into account the presenting symptoms of the patient
  • To be able to record the findings of a headset BIO examination correctly 

Speakers

Rupal Lovell-Patel MCOptom

Academic Lead for Vision Sciences
University of Central Lancashire

This lecture will provide optometrists with insight on how an eye casualty works including triaging of referrals from primary care and possible alternative pathways for urgent eye conditions. It will discuss management and treatment of acute and urgent eye conditions in secondary care including possible treatment and management where appropriate (including prescribing) by Independent Prescribing optometrists within the community. This will ensure that optometrists and IP optometrists manage patients safely within their appropriate expertise and communicates with secondary care for the well being and safety of the patient.

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Standards of practice and Ocular disease 

Therapeutic optometrist: The healthcare system, Knowledge and Safe 

Target audience: Optometrist and Therapeutic optometrist 

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve optometrists understanding of triaging and referrals to eye casualty as well as possible alternatives for non-casualty secondary care pathways for urgent conditions 
  • Is able to identify, investigate, diagnose and manage acute and urgent eye conditions
  • To be able to ensure that a patient with a sight threatening condition is managed appropriately & timely including possible treatment and appropriate referral for further care
  • To enable an optometrist to manage patients presenting with sight threatening eye disease especially conditions that require referral to eye casualty 
  • To understand which patients presenting with acute eye conditions require referring and the appropriate pathway
     

Speakers

Sonia Yong MCOptom

Anterior Eye Lead for Optometry
Bristol Eye Hospital

There are many cases of blepharitis that just don’t seem to improve despite the patient assuring you they are doing all you asked – is that when we should consider Demodex? There’s certainly a lot of interest in these little mites recently; this talk will untangle the myths: what they are, what they do, and how we should think about treating them when they become a problem. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Sarah Farrant MCOptom

Optometrist
Earlam and Christopher Optometrists

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Rebecca Stoner MCOptom

Clinical Affairs Specialist
Topcon (Great Britain) Medical Limited

Discussion workshop to explore how to approach and communicate with children and parents regarding soft contact lens myopia management- from the initial recommendations through to ongoing monitoring. This CET opens up many conversations regarding communication, management and outcomes of potential management.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Mark Chatham

Professional Services Consultant
CooperVision

Neil Retallic MCOptom

Professional Services Manager
CooperVision

No description provided

3.10 PM

This session will consider in detail the imaging of the retinal vasculature utilizing OCT-A. A number of retinal pathologies will be presented to consider how the imaging method may be applied to practice. Current research evidence will be considered along with future use of the technique.

The speaker will provide a broad overview of the imaging at the superficial plexus, deeper plexus, avascular region and choriocapillaris, along with imaging of new vessels and the assessment of retinal perfusion at the start of the session. 

Target group: Optometrist

Competencies covered: Standards of practice, Ocular examination and Ocular disease 

Learning objectives: 

  • Optometrists will have a further understanding of how to investigate and diagnose retinal pathology and make appropriate decisions about optometric management when using OCTA
  • Optometrists will have a greater understanding of how to interpret an OCTA scan and become more confident in how an OCTA can aid clinical decision making and understand its limitations 
  • Optometrists will have a better understanding of how to make more accurate diagnosis and referral decisions in commonly occurring macula pathology when using OCTA.

Speakers

Mr Nishal Patel

Consultant Eye Surgeon
East Kent Hospitals University NHS Trust

Retinal gene therapy for inherited retinal degeneration is fast becoming a clinical reality. Gene therapy for Lebers Congenital Amaurosis was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the programme in Oxford for Choroideremia is entering phase 3 trials. As gene therapy enters the therapeutic domain, optometry will become more involved in both the screening and follow up of patients with inherited retinal degenerations and needs to be aware of the important aspects of vision as well as the possible pitfalls. This seminar will ensure optometrists are updated on the latest developments.

Competencies covered: Ocular Examination, Assessment of Visual Function, Ocular Disease, Standards of Practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand the retinal anatomy and how to assess the retinal structure of patients with inherited retinal degeneration
  • To understand the relationship between visual function and retinal anatomy and how to assess the visual function in patients with inherited retinal degenerations.
  • To understand new treatment paradigms currently being developed and the impact these have on assessment and management of patients with inherited retinal degenerations
  • To understand new retinal gene treatments available and so to be able to explain to patients about possible future treatments

Speakers

Jasleen Jolly MCOptom

NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellow/Specialist Research Optometrist
University of Oxford

Please do not book on to this session unless you are an experienced OCT user.

The presenter will initially set out the basics of how to apply OCT technology in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with macular disease. During this portion of the workshop the presenter will seek to engage delegates by using a quiz based on some real life cases covering the basics of OCT interpretation, where delegates can answer using voting pads. The group will then break up into smaller groups where they will work through cases with a facilitator. Finally, the presenter will summarise the learning points that have come up and take any additional questions. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrists

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how to use OCT images to detect significant abnormalities in macular disease (e.g. age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusion (RVO) and diabetic macular oedema (DMO)
  • To understand OCT images to aid in the recognition and management of macula disease
  • To be able to understand the treatment and follow-up of patients with macula disease.

Speakers

Tomas Burke

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Bristol Eye Hospital

This skills workshop will focus on the symptoms patients with accommodative dysfunction complain of. Delegates will learn how to assess accommodative facility and MEM retinoscopy and interpret the results. Delegates will learn how to formulate a management plan for the patient including spectacles and appropriate vision therapy.

Competencies covered: 

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand the symptoms commonly associated with accommodative dysfunction 
  • To have the ability to measure accommodation by objective and subjective means, and interpret the results
  • To be able to examine and manage patients with learning disabilities presenting with accommodative dysfunction 
  • To be able to manage patients presenting with accommodative and binocular vision dysfunction

Speakers

Dr Catherine Porter MCOptom

Senior Lecturer in Optometry
University of Manchester

This is an introductory workshop to help delegates gain knowledge and hands-on experience of the Headset binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy technique. There will be hints and tips on when to use this technique over other ophthalmoscopy methods and how to get the best view of the fundus using the most appropriate indirect lenses. We will consider how to record the findings and how to explain the technique to the patient. Discussion will be had around use of ophthalmic drugs and gaining consent for carrying out the investigation/assessment.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to explain the use of the headset BIO assessment and reassure the patient if they are unsure or apprehensive 
  • To be able to carry out the headset BIO technique to assess the fundus, taking into account the presenting symptoms of the patient
  • To be able to record the findings of a headset BIO examination correctly 

Speakers

Rupal Lovell-Patel MCOptom

Academic Lead for Vision Sciences
University of Central Lancashire

This lecture is aimed at two levels: firstly at already qualified IP Optometrists to discuss diagnosis and management of anterior and posterior conditions encountered in practice (including contact lens complications, dry eye and post cataract management). It discusses which you treat and which you don’t, the integration with HES Ophthalmology A&E and OPD acute and chronic. 
The session is also aimed at non-IP optometrists whether MECS/PEARS accredited or not. It will highlight the benefits in primary care optometry of the IP qualifications and the benefit in terms of patient management and care.

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Contact lenses and Ocular disease 

Therapeutic optometrist: Knowledge, The healthcare system and Options 

Target audience: Therapeutic optometrist and Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand which contact lens complications can be managed with pharmalogical and non-pharmalogical approaches
  • To understand as an IP optometrist how you intergrate with the HES and local frameworks
  • To understand all the options including steroid treatment when managing patients with dry eye
  • To improve the understanding of post-cataract assessment and management
     

Speakers

Professor Nicholas Rumney FCOptom

Chairman and Therapeutic Optometrist
BBR Optometry Ltd

Exploring the 2 reasons for developing dry eye – Aqueous Deficient & Evaporative. 
What should an ECP be considering when choosing a Dry Eye product? 
There are many Dry Eye Drops available, one will provide prolonged relief – Lacrifresh Ocu-Dry 0.30%. Why is that?
These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Nick Dash MCOptom

Optometrist
Midland Eye

Discussion workshop to share best practice approaches and guidance for astigmatic contact lens patients. Each case opens up discussions around a wide variety of situations that practitioners may face in daily practice. They are based around health and lifestyle considerations for each case along with fitting and prescription considerations also.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Samantha Armstrong

Contact Lens Optician

Chithra Dhanabalan

Professional Services Consultant
CooperVision

No description provided

4.10 PM

No description provided

4.35 PM

This session will give delegates an overview of the anatomy of the cranial nerves involved in ocular motility and their surrounding structures, and will show how the common causes of nerve palsy arise. 
A series of case studies, including patient videos will be used to demonstrate actual examples of ocular motor nerve palsies and show how they might manifest themselves in optometric practice. 
A discussion on onward management and treatment solutions will also be outlined. 

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination, Binocular Vision

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of common causes and risk factors of ocular motor nerve palsies 
  • To understand the role of pupil assessment in the detection of ocular motor nerve palsies
  • To improve the detection and management of patients presenting with ocular motor nerve palsies and incommitant deviations

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Roberth Frith Optometrists

This presentation will update delegates on contemporary techniques in refractive surgery. It will discuss laser surgery, intra-ocular lens implants and refractive lens exchange. It will also cover current guidelines for eligibility for the various techniques. The visual outcomes, side effects and potential complications will be covered for the different procedures to enable optometrists to give patients up-to-date information on their options.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Communication, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand all the current developments and treatment choices available for refractive surgery
  • To improve understanding of current refractive surgery options to treat refractive error and so to be able to explain the options to patients about managing their condition
  • To understand the treatment options, patient suitability and potential outcomes of refractive surgery

 

Speakers

Mr Bruce Allan

Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more

This workshop is for experienced OCT users and will discuss OCT images of the anterior eye. Delegates will look at real world patient cases, with active or diagnosed ocular disease.

Target audience: Optometrist

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and Ocular disease 

Learning objectives: 

  • To refresh experienced users on OCT techniques and the interpretation of artefacts when viewing the images
  • To enhance the skills of experienced users on interpreting signs seen on OCT images of the anterior eye
  • To improve the decision making of experienced users of OCT by increasing the understanding of ocular abnormalitites of the anterior eye and considering when referral is required.

Speakers

Professor Nicholas Rumney FCOptom

Chairman and Therapeutic Optometrist
BBR Optometry Ltd

This interactive workshop will enable optometrists to develop their hands-on skills in gonioscopy. There will be an introduction to the basic principles of gonioscopy followed by an opportunity to practice on patients. Particular attention will be made towards differentiating between open and closed angle glaucoma, as well as looking for key signs of pathology identified on gonioscopy, This will help optometrists improve the range of services they can offer to their patients and work towards engaging in glaucoma enhanced schemes. 

Competencies covered: Ocular disease and Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to use a slit lamp and gonioscopy lens to examine the anterior chamber 
  • To be able to differentiate between open and closed angle glaucoma using gonioscopy 
  • To be able to recognise abnormalities identified through gonioscopy and understand when to refer 

Speakers

Patrick Gunn MCOptom

Principal Optometrist - Training and Education
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital

Delegates will be given an overview of, and hands on experience with, current state-of-the-art technologies for simulating eye disease (in particular, glaucoma). We will assess the theoretical and empirical evidence regarding the validity of such simulations, and will discuss potential applications for such technologies.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular Examination, Standards of Practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how simulations of eye disease can be used to explain to patients and carers the implications of their eye condition, both now and in the future 
  • To understand how our ability to simulate visual impairments is limited by current methods of assessing visual function such as visual fields and colour vision.
  • To give an understanding how simulations of eye disease can be used to encourage a multidisciplinary approach to low vision care 

Speakers

Dr Pete Jones

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
City, University of London, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital

This session is only open to members who have the therapeutics or additional supply qualification. 

To get the most out of the session delegates will need to bring an anonymised case with them. 

More information will follow. 

The Past President of the BCLA shares how to delight presbyopes with multifocal contact lenses. Understand the different designs and how to set expectations for your presbyopic patients so they become the best advocates for your practice.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Brian Tompkins

Independent Optometrist
Tompkins, Knight & Son Optometrists

Comfortable eyes is not just about dry eyes and the tear film – the link with blepharitis is well accepted. But how does this knowledge translate into the recommendations we make for patients? Choosing a good lubricant and giving the right advice to soothe sore eyelids is easy when you think differently about the problem – this talk provides that insight. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Iain Johnson

Contact Lens Optician
Maloney Opticians

This discussion workshop focuses on the importance of a modern day MAR as well as understanding what patients want from their lenses. It will look at the three main areas of: Protection, Visual Performance and Cosmetic Appearance.
This is to aide the delegates in feeling comfortable and confident in recommending the best MAR to their patient and also explaining the benefits if faced with any objection.  

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Andy Hepworth

Professional Relations Manager
Essilor Ltd

Charlotte Timbury

Professional Relations Executive
Essilor Ltd

No description provided

5.35 PM

This is an excellent opportunity for you to:
-    network and engage after the first day of the conference
-    talk about your highlights from the day
-    speak to exhibitors
-    gain app challenge points.

The reception is included in your ticket and drinks and nibbles will be provided. You will be able to mix with other delegates, presenters, exhibitors, College Council members and staff in a relaxed and informal environment.

5.45 PM

Please select this option if you will not be attending the networking reception

Please select this option if either: 

- You will be attending the networking reception but do not want to sit at a topic table 

- You will be attending the networking reception, and would like to sit on a table but there are currently no spaces

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in dry eye. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in dry eye. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in OCT and glaucoma. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in OCT and medical retina. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates to discuss issues facing women in optometry. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates to discuss issues facing women in optometry. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring delegates together who are considering starting the therapeutics qualification. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative who has the qualification. 

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

6.30 PM

Please select this option if you will not be attending the networking reception

Please select this option if either: 

- You will be attending the networking reception but do not want to sit at a topic table 

- You will be attending the networking reception, and would like to sit on a table but there are currently no spaces. 

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in dry eye. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in dry eye. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in OCT and glaucoma. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates interested in OCT and medical retina. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates to discuss issues facing women in optometry. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring together delegates to discuss issues facing women in optometry. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative.

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

This topic table will bring delegates together who are considering starting the therapeutics qualification. The informal discussion will last 30 minutes and will be facilitated by a College representative who has the qualification. 

Topic tables will be situated in the centre of the Monarch Suite during the networking reception. As the discussions are informal CET points are not available. 

Sorry, no sessions were found matching your filters.

You must book a minimum of 6 sessions for this day.

8.00 AM

No description provided

9.00 AM

Inherited retinal diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the UK working age population. They can be caused by mutations in over 200 genes, with many still undiscovered. Some major advances have occurred in recent years allowing us to find the genetic cause in many patients. Also, novel treatments have been trialled for some conditions, with more being developed. This lecture will aim to give an overview of the following: our current understanding of inherited retinal diseases; key investigations in the hospital eye service; advances in genetic screening; novel treatments, including gene therapy, stem cells, and electronic implants. 
Optometrists will be more aware of how to detect inherited retinopathies, better able to advise patients in terms of management, and will be aware of current avenues of research into new treatments, and can convey this knowledge to their patients.

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be aware of how to detect inherited retinal diseases from history taking and its relevance during the examination
  • To improve understanding of inherited retinal diseases, management in specialist hospital eye services, including advances in imaging and genetic screening, so that relevant information can be given to patients about their condition and appropriate referrals made
  • To improve awareness of novel experimental and approved treatments in inherited retinal disease in order to keep knowledge up to date and so this information can be conveyed to patients 

Speakers

Omar Mahroo

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This seminar will aim to bring the delegates up-to-date with the issues surrounding glaucoma care in the elderly and revisit the concept of "dying with sight". The session will focus on the potential risks of over- and under-treatment, the impact of ageing and companion general health issues, frailty and cognitive decline. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the significance of dementia using data from a research study using information from semi-structured interviews with patients, lay carers, and healthcare professionals, exploring understanding of eye drop regimens, barriers, and facilitators to drop administration, as well as attitudes toward glaucoma, dementia, and other comorbidities.

Competencies covered (Optometrist): Communication, Ocular disease, Standards of practice

Competencies covered (Therapeutic Optometrist): Knowledge, Options, Share decision making

Target group: Optometrist, Therapeutic Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To improve explanations to elderly patients with glaucoma about their condition and treatment
  • To understand the significance of ageing and general and cognitive decline in relation to managing glaucoma including prescribing and adverse effects of medication and treatment regimes
  • To learn about a study incorporating the views of patients, carers, and healthcare professionals in relation to dementia and glaucoma and so to be able to support patients more effectively.
  • To understand the risks of both over- and under-treatment of glaucoma in the elderly 
  • To understand the significance of ageing and general and cognitive decline in relation to managing glaucoma including prescribing

Speakers

Dr Robert Harper FCOptom

Optometrist Consultant and Honorary Professor of Optometry
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust and School of Health Sciences, University of Manchester

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more.

This workshop will allow delegates to understand the uses of scan types in detection of glaucoma through a series of cases:
To accurately interpret glaucoma analysis reports to: 

  • Avoid over referrals based on a single abnormal finding from OCT
  • OCT use to differentiate and referral refine glaucoma and glaucoma risk cases 
  • Identifying glaucoma
  • Reinforce that integrating all clinical results is key to best diagnostic capability 
  • OCT’s ability to measure structural changes over time before visual field progression occurs. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • Optometrists will have an evidence based understanding of the use of OCT to assess various structures within the retina for accurate diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma 
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the identification and changes of an optic nerve using OCT to enhance referral decisions in glaucoma suspects
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the use of OCT for assessment of patients with or at risk of chronic open angle glaucoma

Speakers

Mike Horler MCOptom

Optometrist
Specsavers and Sussex Eye Hospital

The workshop will cover basic anatomy of the lacrimal drainage system, specifically dealing with the conditions and anatomical variations that may cause it to block. Patient signs and symptoms will be discussed, leading the practitioner to know when it is appropriate to syringe, and when it may not be. The technique will be described and demonstrated, and delegates will then have the opportunity to carry out the procedure on each other, supervised by the workshop leader and facilitators.

Competencies covered (Optometrist): Standards of Practice, Ocular Examination, Ocular Disease 

Competencies covered (Therapeutic Optometrist): Knowledge, Options, Share Decision Making

Target group: Optometrist, Therapeutic Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand the importance of correct disposal of lacrimal canula once procedure is complete
  • To understand the importance of assessing the tear film and so to determine if syringing is appropriate for the patient
  • To understand when it is not appropriate to consider lacrimal syringing, especially in the presence of external pathology.
  • To understand the aetiology of epiphoria and so what appropriate treatment and management is required for a patient
  • To understand how best to approach and appropriately treat epiphora
  • To understand how to assess whether the epiphora will be relieved by lacrimal syringing, or if it is due to some other factors
  • To learn the best way of explaining the procedure of lacrimal syringing to a patient.

Speakers

Amanda Davidson MCOptom

Optometrist
Independent

This discussion workshop uses case studies from the presenter's own paediatric practice. She will give practical advice on how to adapt the consulting room routine to get the best out of seeing paediatric cases - both in terms of the tests performed and specialist equipment needed. She will discuss when to prescribe for children and when to employ alternative strategies such as exercises or negative adds. She will touch upon psychological factors including malingering and how to discuss this in a positive way with the child's parent/carer. The session will also look at practical management of common paediatric BV anomalies in practice. This workshop intends to build confidence in managing paediatric cases in the primary care setting, reducing the need for referral into secondary care.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision, Communication

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To improve the understanding of how to adapt your routine examination when examining children and which are the most appropriate tests to use
  • To improve the understanding of how to manage binocular vision anomalies in children in community practice and when exercises are appropriate
  • To understand how to refract children and when they will benefit from a spectacle prescription
  • To improve communication with a child and their parents and how to explain conditions such as malingering effectively.

 

Speakers

Polly Dulley MCOptom

Optometrist
Aves Optometrists

More information on the cases and competencies will follow. 

All peer discussion sessions on Monday will cover the same three topics so you only need to attend one session. 

Exploring the 2 reasons for developing dry eye – Aqueous Deficient & Evaporative. 
What should an ECP be considering when choosing a Dry Eye product? 
There are many Dry Eye Drops available, one will provide prolonged relief – Lacrifresh Ocu-Dry 0.30%. Why is that?

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Nick Dash MCOptom

Optometrist
Midland Eye

This interactive workshop will provide an opportunity for delegates to understand how the growing use of OCT in primary eye care can help refine referrals and improve patient care. A presentation will cover the basics of OCT retinal interpretation, looking at both normal and abnormal eyes. Delegates will then have the opportunity to discuss OCT scans, identify the retinal layers and interpret images of common abnormal conditions with feedback from the facilitator to enhance learning. Patient management for a selection of cases will be discussed in the context of the additional information provided by OCT scans.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Nicola Bennett

Clinical Affairs Specialist
Topcon (Great Britain) Medical Limited

Myopia control is rapidly emerging as a critical need for our younger patients. Hear the latest research and clinical advice on using multi-focal contact lenses for managing myopia in children.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Andrew Price

MD
The ADP Consultancy

No description provided

10.05 AM

AMD is a common disorder, so knowledge about this condition and current treatments/research is important for optometrists and dispensing opticians. This lecture will update delegates on current research and clinical trials for treatment for patients with wet and dry AMD. They will understand what the current options are and possible future treatments and so be able to discuss and manage patients more effectively.

Competencies covered:  

Optometrist: Communication, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Dispensing optician: Communication, Ocular abnormalities and Standards of practice 

Target audience: Optometrist and Dispensing optician 

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of AMD and so to be able to explain the condition to patients more effectively
  • To improve the understanding of the investigation, diagnosis and management of AMD and so refer where appropriate
  • To understand current and potential treatments for AMD
  • To understand recent and current clinical trials on treatment for AMD (dry and wet) and the impact on patient management
     

Speakers

Clare Bailey

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Bristol Eye Hospital

Over 5% of the UK population now has diabetes and rates are rising. This predominantly relates to increases in type 2 diabetes. Community based screening for diabetic retinopathy has now been instituted for over 10 years in the UK and is showing benefits. This session discusses the time course and risk factors for diabetic micro and macro vascular complications and how this relates to diabetic retinopathy findings. By the end of this session, participants should be able to discuss in a more evidence based manner the need for timely retinal screening and the implications of “background” and more advanced levels of change. This will allow the optometrist to play their part in guiding patients to optimal self-management.

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Communication 

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be able to understand the time course and risk factors for diabetes microvascular complications including retinopathy
  • To improve the understanding and recognition of the different stages of diabetic retinopathy and micro and macro vascular complications of diabetes
  • To understand the differences in blood glucose management approaches in type 1 and 2 diabetes, and the different stages of diabetic retinopathy, to be able to explain effectively to patients and what it means to them

Speakers

Professor Colin Dayan

Professor of Clinical Diabetes & Metabolism
School of Medicine, Cardiff University

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more.

This workshop will allow delegates to understand the uses of scan types in detection of glaucoma through a series of cases:
To accurately interpret glaucoma analysis reports to: 

  • Avoid over referrals based on a single abnormal finding from OCT
  • OCT use to differentiate and referral refine glaucoma and glaucoma risk cases 
  • Identifying glaucoma
  • Reinforce that integrating all clinical results is key to best diagnostic capability 
  • OCT’s ability to measure structural changes over time before visual field progression occurs. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • Optometrists will have an evidence based understanding of the use of OCT to assess various structures within the retina for accurate diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma 
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the identification and changes of an optic nerve using OCT to enhance referral decisions in glaucoma suspects
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the use of OCT for assessment of patients with or at risk of chronic open angle glaucoma

Speakers

Mike Horler MCOptom

Optometrist
Specsavers and Sussex Eye Hospital

This skills workshop will consider historical aspects of contact lens development and will endeavour to demonstrate the genius of Victorian pioneers and use their fundamental principles in combination with modern technological advances. Delegates will have the opportunity to examine, assess and evaluate Rigid Gas Permeable mini scleral contact lenses on eye with attention not only to fitting routines, but also patient communication styles and the importance of patient comfort and consent. On completion of the workshop attendees will be able to reflect on fitting procedures and clinical conditions which require a specialty product and a specific approach. Handling skills will ensure professionals are confident and capable of contact lens removal in the event of an emergency.

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice, Contact Lenses

Target group: Optometrist, Contact Lens Optician

Learning objectives: 

  • To be able to identify and empathise with any patient concerns or anxieties and establish an appropriate level of professionalism in order to gain patient confidence and trust. To communicate in a style and format which will facilitate patient co-operation and compliance during contact lens fitting
  • To be able to recognise non verbal clues which would indicate any lack of understanding or nervousness and ensure full consent before proceeding with contact lens fitting
  • To understand a range of designs and be able to make an appropriate choice of Rigid Gas Permeable contact lens and so be able to make valued judgement on assessment of fitting, with any adjustments which may be considered necessary and appropriate.
  • To be aware of the range of contact lenses used when managing complex ocular conditions such as keratoconus, post refractive ectasia, post graft, or any other condition requiring 'specialty' products. Be able to effectively handle and manage modern large diameter contact lenses.
  • To be able to identify and empathise with any patient concerns or anxieties and establish an appropriate level of professionalism in order to gain patient confidence and trust. To communicate in a style and format which will facilitate patient co-operation and compliance during contact lens fitting
  • To be able to recognise non verbal clues which would indicate any lack of understanding or nervousness and ensure full consent before proceeding with contact lens fitting
  • To understand a range of designs and be able to make an appropriate choice of Rigid Gas Permeable contact lens and so be able to make valued judgement on assessment of fitting, with any adjustments which may be considered necessary and appropriate.
  • To be aware of the range of contact lenses used when managing complex ocular conditions such as keratoconus, post refractive ectasia, post graft, or any other condition requiring 'specialty' products. Be able to effectively handle and manage modern large diameter contact lenses.

This session is sponsored by No7 Contact Lenses

Speakers

Nick Howard

Contact Lens Optician
Icontact Ltd

This discussion workshop uses case studies from the presenter's own paediatric practice. She will give practical advice on how to adapt the consulting room routine to get the best out of seeing paediatric cases - both in terms of the tests performed and specialist equipment needed. She will discuss when to prescribe for children and when to employ alternative strategies such as exercises or negative adds. She will touch upon psychological factors including malingering and how to discuss this in a positive way with the child's parent/carer. The session will also look at practical management of common paediatric BV anomalies in practice. This workshop intends to build confidence in managing paediatric cases in the primary care setting, reducing the need for referral into secondary care.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision, Communication

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To improve the understanding of how to adapt your routine examination when examining children and which are the most appropriate tests to use
  • To improve the understanding of how to manage binocular vision anomalies in children in community practice and when exercises are appropriate
  • To understand how to refract children and when they will benefit from a spectacle prescription
  • To improve communication with a child and their parents and how to explain conditions such as malingering effectively.

Speakers

Polly Dulley MCOptom

Optometrist
Aves Optometrists

More information on the cases and competencies will follow. 

All peer discussion sessions on Monday will cover the same three topics so you only need to attend one session. 

Comfortable eyes is not just about dry eyes and the tear film – the link with blepharitis is well accepted. But how does this knowledge translate into the recommendations we make for patients? Choosing a good lubricant and giving the right advice to soothe sore eyelids is easy when you think differently about the problem – this talk provides that insight. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Iain Johnson

Contact Lens Optician
Maloney Opticians

The steps to success with multifocal contact lenses by Johnson and Johnson Vision 

This section of the session will take the opportunity to break down the different sections of the recommended approach to dry eye disease identification and initial management. Using the DEWSII (2018) report recommended approach we will look at the stepwise approach step by step, considering what is required and enabling each delegate to take the opportunity to plan how they will apply this to thier own dry eye practice improving dry eye care for their patients. 

Understanding DEWSII an approach to dry eye disease identification by Alcon Eyecare UK Ltd

This section of the session will introduce the key factors which should be considered with fitting presbyopic patients with contact lenses. 

Target group: Optometrist and Contact lens optician 

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Contact lenses, Ocular examination, Ocular disease and Standards of practice 

Contact lens optician: Ocular examination, Standards of practice and Contact lenses 

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how a multifocal contact lens design reacts to the fit, centration and pupil size and how these ultimately affect vision and to understand (through discussion and observation) fitting techniques which can be employed to achieve maximum success rates with multifocal fitting
  • To recognise how the anterior eye changes with age and is able to identify and manage ageing changes. To understand how these changes affect the choice of contact lens material, design and fitting criteria for a presbyope
  • To understand the impact of a poor quality tear film on the success of a contact lens fitting, and how best to observe this using a slit lamp.
  • To consider and understand the different diagnostic tests proposed in the DEWSII approach to dry eye disease diagnosis and management, with a view to delegate using these most appropriately/accurately within their practice
  • Using the DEWSII approach to dry eye disease identification and management the delegate will be able to adopt this approach into their own dry eye management routine
  • Using the DEWSII approach to dry eye disease identification and management the delegate will be able to apply recent clinical research to their practice

Video based case discussions to encourage best practice approaches with contact lens patients.  Each case highlights a  different patient base and the potential areas for consideration for each.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Gurraj Jabbal MCOptom

Professional Services Consultant
CooperVision

Neil Retallic MCOptom

Professional Services Manager
CooperVision

No description provided

11.05 AM

No description provided

11.30 AM

Primary eye care practitioners evaluate patients with a wide diversity of clinical problems some of which include features of potentially serious neurological disease which requires prompt recognition and onward referral. This lecture focuses on three groups of problems which can represent the beginning of a more serious problem and outlines how to gain confidence with evaluation and decision making, supporting safe community-based independent practice.
These problems are evaluation of swollen discs, double vision, and eyelid and pupil changes. 

Competencies covered: Ocular disease, Binocular vision, Ocular examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To improve the understanding of how to evaluate swollen optic discs, to be able to distinguish between papilloedema and pseudopapilloedema and how to appropriately manage those at risk of neurological disease.
  • To improve the understanding of how to evaluate and manage patients presenting with double vision, to understand potential neurological causes and how to differentiate between benign and potentially dangerous causes.
  • To improve the understanding of pupil assessment and when ptosis and unequal pupils may indicate a serious neurological condition.

Speakers

James Acheson

Consultant Neuro-Ophthalmologist
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This seminar aims to help optometrists understand how they can work with other healthcare professionals to ensure their patients are compliant with their treatment regimes. 
Patients using eye drops often struggle with putting them in or do not use them at the correct times they have been instructed, and data shows that as many as 50% are non-compliant for various reasons with using medicines. Eye drops are no exception and even in glaucoma which can lead to vision loss if poorly managed, patients are still only 50% compliant with using their eye drops.
It is essential therefore that healthcare professionals including optometrists are a) aware of this fact b) aware of the barriers to compliance which patients may be experiencing, and c) ways to help support them.
With improved adherence to their treatment regimen, patients are more likely to have better medical outcomes, better quality of life, less follow up appointments (due to condition not improving), likely less drops to use and less repeat prescriptions. In turn this helps improve the burden on the NHS for resources and finances.
Giving optometrists information to understand these issues will help them in turn to be able to improve the care and ultimately the sight of their patients

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:  

  • To understand how to effectively explain to patients and their carers the importance of following advice when using eye drops and the consequence to their eye health if treatment plans are not adhered to
  • To understand the optometrists' role in helping to ensure that patients adhere to treatment regimes and their role in the wider NHS team, to improve patient compliance.
  • To improve the understanding of the barriers to treatment regimes and the use of eye drops in patients suffering from glaucoma and other common ocular conditions and to understand the impact on ocular health when compliance is poor
  • To understand the difficulties that patients and their carers have to using eye drops and following treatment regimes and strategies an optometrist can use to help them follow advice given by healthcare professionals

Speakers

Sarah Thomas

Lead Pharmacist Satellite Services and Contracts and KnowYourDrops co-founder
Moorfields Eye Hospital

Fiona Chiu

Associate Chief Pharmacist and KnowYourDrops co-founder
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 

Speakers

Dr Irene Ctori MCOptom

Council Member and Lecturer
The College of Optometrists and City, University of London

This skills workshop will consider historical aspects of contact lens development and will endeavour to demonstrate the genius of Victorian pioneers and use their fundamental principles in combination with modern technological advances. Delegates will have the opportunity to examine, assess and evaluate Rigid Gas Permeable mini scleral contact lenses on eye with attention not only to fitting routines, but also patient communication styles and the importance of patient comfort and consent. On completion of the workshop attendees will be able to reflect on fitting procedures and clinical conditions which require a specialty product and a specific approach. Handling skills will ensure professionals are confident and capable of contact lens removal in the event of an emergency.

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice, Contact Lenses

Target group: Optometrist, Contact Lens Optician

Learning objectives: 

  • To be able to identify and empathise with any patient concerns or anxieties and establish an appropriate level of professionalism in order to gain patient confidence and trust. To communicate in a style and format which will facilitate patient co-operation and compliance during contact lens fitting
  • To be able to recognise non verbal clues which would indicate any lack of understanding or nervousness and ensure full consent before proceeding with contact lens fitting
  • To understand a range of designs and be able to make an appropriate choice of Rigid Gas Permeable contact lens and so be able to make valued judgement on assessment of fitting, with any adjustments which may be considered necessary and appropriate.
  • To be aware of the range of contact lenses used when managing complex ocular conditions such as keratoconus, post refractive ectasia, post graft, or any other condition requiring 'specialty' products. Be able to effectively handle and manage modern large diameter contact lenses.
  • To be able to identify and empathise with any patient concerns or anxieties and establish an appropriate level of professionalism in order to gain patient confidence and trust. To communicate in a style and format which will facilitate patient co-operation and compliance during contact lens fitting
  • To be able to recognise non verbal clues which would indicate any lack of understanding or nervousness and ensure full consent before proceeding with contact lens fitting
  • To understand a range of designs and be able to make an appropriate choice of Rigid Gas Permeable contact lens and so be able to make valued judgement on assessment of fitting, with any adjustments which may be considered necessary and appropriate.
  • To be aware of the range of contact lenses used when managing complex ocular conditions such as keratoconus, post refractive ectasia, post graft, or any other condition requiring 'specialty' products. Be able to effectively handle and manage modern large diameter contact lenses.

This session is sponsored by No7 Contact Lenses

Speakers

Nick Howard

Contact Lens Optician
Icontact Ltd

The workshop will cover basic anatomy of the lacrimal drainage system, specifically dealing with the conditions and anatomical variations that may cause it to block. Patient signs and symptoms will be discussed, leading the practitioner to know when it is appropriate to syringe, and when it may not be. The technique will be described and demonstrated, and delegates will then have the opportunity to carry out the procedure on each other, supervised by the workshop leader and facilitators.

Competencies covered (Optometrist): Standards of Practice, Ocular Examination, Ocular Disease 

Competencies covered (Therapeutic Optometrist): Knowledge, Options, Share Decision Making

Target group: Optometrist, Therapeutic Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand the importance of correct disposal of lacrimal canula once procedure is complete
  • To understand the importance of assessing the tear film and so to determine if syringing is appropriate for the patient
  • To understand when it is not appropriate to consider lacrimal syringing, especially in the presence of external pathology.
  • To understand the aetiology of epiphoria and so what appropriate treatment and management is required for a patient
  • To understand how best to approach and appropriately treat epiphora
  • To understand how to assess whether the epiphora will be relieved by lacrimal syringing, or if it is due to some other factors
  • To learn the best way of explaining the procedure of lacrimal syringing to a patient.

Speakers

Amanda Davidson MCOptom

Optometrist
Independent

More information on the cases and competencies will follow. 

All peer discussion sessions on Monday will cover the same three topics so you only need to attend one session. 

There are many cases of blepharitis that just don’t seem to improve despite the patient assuring you they are doing all you asked – is that when we should consider Demodex? There’s certainly a lot of interest in these little mites recently; this talk will untangle the myths: what they are, what they do, and how we should think about treating them when they become a problem. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Sarah Farrant MCOptom

Optometrist
Earlam and Christopher Optometrists

Insights show that the average age for starting contact lens wear in the UK is 20, yet we know that for the younger generation contact lenses can enhance confidence and improve lifestyle. In this interactive discussion workshop, we will examine how subtle changes to your communication with younger patients can make a big difference in the patient’s experience.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Clair Bulpin MCOptom

Optometrist

Discussion workshop to explore how to approach and communicate with children and parents regarding soft contact lens myopia management- from the initial recommendations through to ongoing monitoring. This CET opens up many conversations regarding communication, management and outcomes of potential management.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Mark Chatham

Professional Services Consultant
CooperVision

Neil Retallic MCOptom

Professional Services Manager
CooperVision

No description provided

12.30 PM

No description provided

1.35 PM

No description provided

1.40 PM

In the summer of 2015, two patients with subretinal bleeds were implanted with patches of stem cell-derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE). This keynote lecture by the Director of the 'London Project to Cure Blindness' will focus on their journey and whether we are any closer to finding a cure for blindness.

The session will cover:
- the disease process of AMD
- the physiology and pathological processes
- the types of patients that were suitable for treatment (wet AMD)
- the details of the trial and its results.

By using stem cell based therapies, the team hope to be able to prevent blindness, restore sight and improve the quality of life of those who suffer from retinal diseases, especially age-related macular degeneration. 

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of practice, Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of AMD and its treatments and so be able to explain clearly to patients the implications of their eye condition
  • To improve the understanding of current research into treatments of AMD, stem cell therapies and the potential future treatments of retinal disease
  • To improve the understanding of the types of AMD and the different stages of the disease and so be able to identify those where referral and treatment is appropriate
  • To understand both current and future potential treatments for wet AMD

Speakers

Professor Pete Coffey

Theme Lead for Development, Ageing and Disease
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology

More information on the cases and competencies will follow. 

All peer discussion sessions on Monday will cover the same three topics so you only need to attend one session. 

No description provided

2.45 PM

No description provided

3.30 PM

No description provided

3.55 PM

This presentation will discuss examples of paediatric conditions that may present to community optometrists. It will cover the classic presentations of conditions such as retinoblastoma, optic disc swelling and paediatric cataract and the important signs that should not be missed when examining children. 
The presentation will ensure that delegates understand the appropriate urgency of referral for each of the conditions to the Hospital Eye Service.

Competencies covered: Standards of practice, Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve understanding of when it is appropriate to refer paediatric patients to Hospital Eye Services, the appropriate urgency and taking into consideration the best interests of the patient.
  • To be able to understand the risk factors for various paediatric conditions that may present in community practice
  • To be able to investigate and manage appropriately paediatric ocular pathology and understand those that may need routine or urgent referral to the Hospital Eye service

 

Speakers

Cathy Williams

Consultant Paediatric Ophthalmologist and Reader in Paediatric Ophthalmology
Bristol Eye Hospital and University of Bristol

This CET will provide an overview of the evidence linking modifiable lifestyle factors to ocular disease e.g. smoking, diet and exercise, and alcohol consumption. It will also provide evidence-based recommendations for the benefit of targeting these factors. A pilot ‘Healthy Living Optician’ scheme delivered from community optometry practices will be described in which optometry practices offer smoking cessation, alcohol interventions and NHS Health Checks.

Competencies covered: 

Optometrist: Standards of practice and Ocular disease 

Dispensing optician: Standards of practice

Target audience: Optometrist and Dispensing optician 

Learning objectives:

  • To understand the evidence linking modifiable lifestyle factors to the development of ocular disease and so to be able to advise patients on changes to their lifestyle accordingly
  • To understand the evidence linking lifestyle factors to ocular disease and to be aware of public health priorities and costs to NHS due to unhealthy lifestyles
  • To understand the risk factors for common ocular conditions and to appreciate the potential community optometry practices have in targeting modifiable risk factors and delivering health promotion interventions
     

Speakers

Professor John Lawrenson FCOptom

Professor of Clinical Visual Science
City, University of London

Michelle Dyoss

Public Health Specialist
Selph Consultancy

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more.

This workshop will allow delegates to understand the uses of scan types in detection of glaucoma through a series of cases:
To accurately interpret glaucoma analysis reports to: 

  • Avoid over referrals based on a single abnormal finding from OCT
  • OCT use to differentiate and referral refine glaucoma and glaucoma risk cases 
  • Identifying glaucoma
  • Reinforce that integrating all clinical results is key to best diagnostic capability 
  • OCT’s ability to measure structural changes over time before visual field progression occurs. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • Optometrists will have an evidence based understanding of the use of OCT to assess various structures within the retina for accurate diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma 
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the identification and changes of an optic nerve using OCT to enhance referral decisions in glaucoma suspects
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the use of OCT for assessment of patients with or at risk of chronic open angle glaucoma

Speakers

Mike Horler MCOptom

Optometrist
Specsavers and Sussex Eye Hospital

This workshop will combine an element of didactic teaching using projected slides with a hands on practical session. The short talk with slides at the beginning of the workshop is to reacquaint delegates with a technique and part of the eye of which they may have little or no experience. Following this delegates will have an understanding of the indications for carrying out gonioscopy along with an understanding of what they will see whilst carrying out the technique and how to interpret what they see to facilitate the process of grading the anterior chamber angle. The differing techniques used with the two most common forms of gonioscopy lens will be demonstrated, and during a closely supervised hand-on practical session using patients, the delegates will have the opportunity to try both techniques for themselves.

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:  

  • To appreciate the indications for carrying out gonioscopy and patients that are at risk of glaucoma
  • To be able to identify the structures of the anterior chamber angle and to grade the angle and so understand when referral is required
  • To understand how a gonioscopy lens works, the most common types of lens and how to perform the technique.

Speakers

Dr Dan Rosser MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

This workshop is aimed at optometrists of all abilities who want to improve their practical BV skills. Using a combination of short presentations, practical demonstrations and audience participation, the delegates will have the opportunity to evaluate their technique with a variety of tests including cover test and ocular motility. 

The presenter will discuss each of the techniques in turn, demonstrating the optimum method in each case, and then observe as delegates perform the tests on each other and patients. The presenter will be on hand to give one-to-one guidance to the delegates, ensuring that they get the most out of the session.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To have a fresher understanding of the core tests used to assess the binocular vision system in both adults and children such as ocular motor balance and know what normal results to expect for each group
  • To have a fresher understanding of the indications for using a variety of BV tests and know how to relay the results into a patient management plan
  • To have a fresher understanding of the techniques for getting the best results from a selection of tests for BV, to understand when to choose additional tests and how to interpret the results and differentiate patients presenting with incommitant deviations.

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Roberth Frith Optometrists

More information on the cases and competencies will follow. 

All peer discussion sessions on Monday will cover the same three topics so you only need to attend one session. 

Exploring the 2 reasons for developing dry eye – Aqueous Deficient & Evaporative. 
What should an ECP be considering when choosing a Dry Eye product? 
There are many Dry Eye Drops available, one will provide prolonged relief – Lacrifresh Ocu-Dry 0.30%. Why is that?

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Nick Dash MCOptom

Optometrist
Midland Eye

A peer discussion comprising on 4 tasks exploring the need for enhanced single vision lenses. It comprises of 2 case studies, a discussion on different manufacturer options available and a discussion on what these lens type claim to resolve.
A variety of options are considered and the delegates are encouraged to use their own experiences in practice to contribute to the discussion.  

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Andy Hepworth

Professional Relations Manager
Essilor Ltd

Charlotte Timbury

Professional Relations Executive
Essilor Ltd

It’s a super challenge! There are ten patients in your waiting room needing your expert diagnosis but, you only have an hour left of the day. That’s not the worst news either; they are all over 40!  Can you handle the heat? In this fast-paced, interactive discussion workshop you will work alongside your peers as a group to diagnose and manage 10 different patients, with a wide range of symptoms.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Sarah Long

Professional Affairs Consultant
Johnson & Johnson Vision

No description provided

5.00 PM

Regulatory requirements for DVLA notification are published but sometimes the advice and requirements seem conflicting and confused. This lecture will review the legal requirements but give examples of good practice to aid in this sensitive area which can often threaten the essential and important patient/optometrist relationship.

Target group: Optometrist

Competencies covered: Communication and Standards of practice

Learning objectives:

  • To improve the ability to break the news appropriately to patients when they fall below the DVLA visual requirements
  • To improve the advice given to patients when advising them about their ability to drive, understanding the impact on their lifestyle and their responsibility to notify the DVLA.
  • To understand the correct process for DVLA notification and the legal obligations of an optometrist in relation to consent and confidentiality

Speakers

Ian Pearce

Director of Clinical Eye Research Centre
St Paul’s Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more

This workshop is for experienced OCT users and will discuss OCT images of the anterior eye. Delegates will look at real world patient cases, with active or diagnosed ocular disease.

Target audience: Optometrist

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and Ocular disease 

Learning objectives: 

  • To refresh experienced users on OCT techniques and the interpretation of artefacts when viewing the images
  • To enhance the skills of experienced users on interpreting signs seen on OCT images of the anterior eye
  • To improve the decision making of experienced users of OCT by increasing the understanding of ocular abnormalitites of the anterior eye and considering when referral is required.

Speakers

Professor Nicholas Rumney FCOptom

Chairman and Therapeutic Optometrist
BBR Optometry Ltd

This workshop will combine an element of didactic teaching using projected slides with a hands on practical session. The short talk with slides at the beginning of the workshop is to reacquaint delegates with a technique and part of the eye of which they may have little or no experience. Following this delegates will have an understanding of the indications for carrying out gonioscopy along with an understanding of what they will see whilst carrying out the technique and how to interpret what they see to facilitate the process of grading the anterior chamber angle. The differing techniques used with the two most common forms of gonioscopy lens will be demonstrated, and during a closely supervised hand-on practical session using patients, the delegates will have the opportunity to try both techniques for themselves.

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:  

  • To appreciate the indications for carrying out gonioscopy and patients that are at risk of glaucoma
  • To be able to identify the structures of the anterior chamber angle and to grade the angle and so understand when referral is required
  • To understand how a gonioscopy lens works, the most common types of lens and how to perform the technique.

Speakers

Dr Dan Rosser MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

This workshop is aimed at optometrists of all abilities who want to improve their practical BV skills. Using a combination of short presentations, practical demonstrations and audience participation, the delegates will have the opportunity to evaluate their technique with a variety of tests including cover test and ocular motility. 

The presenter will discuss each of the techniques in turn, demonstrating the optimum method in each case, and then observe as delegates perform the tests on each other and patients. The presenter will be on hand to give one-to-one guidance to the delegates, ensuring that they get the most out of the session.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To have a fresher understanding of the core tests used to assess the binocular vision system in both adults and children such as ocular motor balance and know what normal results to expect for each group
  • To have a fresher understanding of the indications for using a variety of BV tests and know how to relay the results into a patient management plan
  • To have a fresher understanding of the techniques for getting the best results from a selection of tests for BV, to understand when to choose additional tests and how to interpret the results and differentiate patients presenting with incommitant deviations

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Roberth Frith Optometrists

More information on the cases and competencies will follow. 

All peer discussion sessions on Monday will cover the same three topics so you only need to attend one session. 

No description provided

 

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