Optometry Tomorrow Bitesize 2019

Date:

9.15am – 5.20pm, 6 October 2019 Add to calendar

Location:

DoubleTree by Hilton Milton Keynes , Stadium Mk, Stadium Way, Milton Keynes, MK1 1ST

Interactive CET event CET 9

Programme

Please see below the current programme for Optomtery Tomorrow Bitesize 2019, or click here to download a PDF version. 

If you attended any of these sessions at Optometry Tomorrow 2019 then you cannot receive the CET points again. For more information about CET click here.

Sorry, no sessions were found matching your filters.

You must book a minimum of 0 sessions for this day.

9.15 AM
This is an opportunity to register and network with fellow attendees and exhibitors. We encourage you to arrive by 9.30am to allow yourself plenty of time to park and register. 
10.00 AM
Welcome from College President, Professor Ed Mallen MCOptom
10.15 AM

This session will give delegates an overview of the anatomy of the cranial nerves involved in ocular motility and their surrounding structures, and will show how the common causes of nerve palsy arise. 
A series of case studies, including patient videos will be used to demonstrate actual examples of ocular motor nerve palsies and show how they might manifest themselves in optometric practice. 
A discussion on onward management and treatment solutions will also be outlined. 

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination, Binocular Vision

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of common causes and risk factors of ocular motor nerve palsies 
  • To understand the role of pupil assessment in the detection of ocular motor nerve palsies
  • To improve the detection and management of patients presenting with ocular motor nerve palsies and incommitant deviations

Related content 

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Robert Frith Optometrists

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more.

This workshop will allow delegates to understand the uses of scan types in detection of glaucoma through a series of cases:
To accurately interpret glaucoma analysis reports to: 

  • Avoid over referrals based on a single abnormal finding from OCT
  • OCT use to differentiate and referral refine glaucoma and glaucoma risk cases 
  • Identifying glaucoma
  • Reinforce that integrating all clinical results is key to best diagnostic capability 
  • OCT’s ability to measure structural changes over time before visual field progression occurs. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • Optometrists will have an evidence based understanding of the use of OCT to assess various structures within the retina for accurate diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma 
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the identification and changes of an optic nerve using OCT to enhance referral decisions in glaucoma suspects
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the use of OCT for assessment of patients with or at risk of chronic open angle glaucoma

Related content 

Speakers

Mike Horler MCOptom

Optometrist
Specsavers and Sussex Eye Hospital

This discussion workshop uses case studies from the presenter's own paediatric practice. She will give practical advice on how to adapt the consulting room routine to get the best out of seeing paediatric cases - both in terms of the tests performed and specialist equipment needed. She will discuss when to prescribe for children and when to employ alternative strategies such as exercises or negative adds. She will touch upon psychological factors including malingering and how to discuss this in a positive way with the child's parent/carer. The session will also look at practical management of common paediatric BV anomalies in practice. This workshop intends to build confidence in managing paediatric cases in the primary care setting, reducing the need for referral into secondary care.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision, Communication

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To improve the understanding of how to adapt your routine examination when examining children and which are the most appropriate tests to use
  • To improve the understanding of how to manage binocular vision anomalies in children in community practice and when exercises are appropriate
  • To understand how to refract children and when they will benefit from a spectacle prescription
  • To improve communication with a child and their parents and how to explain conditions such as malingering effectively.

Speakers

Polly Dulley MCOptom

Optometrist
Aves Optometrists

All peer discussion sessions will cover the same three topics, so you only need to attend one session. 

This peer discussion session will help optometrists improve their standards of patient care by discussing cases that are based on real practice with a small group of fellow clinicians. Discussing various approaches among peers stimulates interest and broadens perspectives as different practitioners may approach clinical and ethical problems in different ways.

The case studies to be discussed are: PVD, toric lenses and post cataract surgery refraction.

Learning objectives:

  • Manage the patient’s expectations when dealing with potential dispensing challenges and explain the options available
  • Select appropriate correction options for patients with anisometropia caused by monocular cataract extraction
  • Suggest suitable contact lens options to manage the correction of anisometropia in presbyopic patients
  • Understand the risks associated with cataract surgery and how to solve the refractive issues encountered following surgery 
  • Manage a patient’s expectations when fitting toric contact lenses
  • Know how to choose and fit suitable soft contact lenses making appropriate adjustments as necessary 
  • Knows how to select the appropriate toric lens for the patient’s needs and parameters 
  • Explain to a patient relevant information regarding PVD in a clear manner and use appropriate written material
  • Understand the risk factors for PVD and retinal detachment
  • Know how to investigate a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment
  • Evaluate and manage a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment

Competencies: Communication, Optical appliances, Contact lenses and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

No description provided

11.15 AM
This is an opportunity to have some tea/coffee and speak further with fellow attendees and exhibitors.
11.45 AM

This lecture will aim to bring the delegates up-to-date with the issues surrounding glaucoma care in the elderly and revisit the concept of "dying with sight". The session will focus on the potential risks of over- and under-treatment, the impact of ageing and companion general health issues, frailty and cognitive decline. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the significance of dementia using data from a research study using information from semi-structured interviews with patients, lay carers, and healthcare professionals, exploring understanding of eye drop regimens, barriers, and facilitators to drop administration, as well as attitudes toward glaucoma, dementia, and other comorbidities.

Competencies covered (Optometrist): Communication, Ocular disease, Standards of practice

Competencies covered (Therapeutic Optometrist): Knowledge, Options, Share decision making

Target group: Optometrist, Therapeutic Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To improve explanations to elderly patients with glaucoma about their condition and treatment
  • To understand the significance of ageing and general and cognitive decline in relation to managing glaucoma including prescribing and adverse effects of medication and treatment regimes
  • To learn about a study incorporating the views of patients, carers, and healthcare professionals in relation to dementia and glaucoma and so to be able to support patients more effectively.
  • To understand the risks of both over- and under-treatment of glaucoma in the elderly 
  • To understand the significance of ageing and general and cognitive decline in relation to managing glaucoma including prescribing

Related content

Speakers

Dr Robert Harper FCOptom

Optometrist Consultant and Honorary Professor of Optometry
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust and School of Health Sciences, University of Manchester

This session is aimed at delegates who have been using an OCT for 6 months or more.

This workshop will allow delegates to understand the uses of scan types in detection of glaucoma through a series of cases:
To accurately interpret glaucoma analysis reports to: 

  • Avoid over referrals based on a single abnormal finding from OCT
  • OCT use to differentiate and referral refine glaucoma and glaucoma risk cases 
  • Identifying glaucoma
  • Reinforce that integrating all clinical results is key to best diagnostic capability 
  • OCT’s ability to measure structural changes over time before visual field progression occurs. 

Competencies covered: Ocular examination, Ocular disease and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • Optometrists will have an evidence based understanding of the use of OCT to assess various structures within the retina for accurate diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma 
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the identification and changes of an optic nerve using OCT to enhance referral decisions in glaucoma suspects
  • Optometrists will have an enhanced understanding of the use of OCT for assessment of patients with or at risk of chronic open angle glaucoma

Related content 

Speakers

Mike Horler MCOptom

Optometrist
Specsavers and Sussex Eye Hospital

This discussion workshop uses case studies from the presenter's own paediatric practice. She will give practical advice on how to adapt the consulting room routine to get the best out of seeing paediatric cases - both in terms of the tests performed and specialist equipment needed. She will discuss when to prescribe for children and when to employ alternative strategies such as exercises or negative adds. She will touch upon psychological factors including malingering and how to discuss this in a positive way with the child's parent/carer. The session will also look at practical management of common paediatric BV anomalies in practice. This workshop intends to build confidence in managing paediatric cases in the primary care setting, reducing the need for referral into secondary care.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision, Communication

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To improve the understanding of how to adapt your routine examination when examining children and which are the most appropriate tests to use
  • To improve the understanding of how to manage binocular vision anomalies in children in community practice and when exercises are appropriate
  • To understand how to refract children and when they will benefit from a spectacle prescription
  • To improve communication with a child and their parents and how to explain conditions such as malingering effectively.

Speakers

Polly Dulley MCOptom

Optometrist
Aves Optometrists

All peer discussion sessions will cover the same three topics, so you only need to attend one session. 

This peer discussion session will help optometrists improve their standards of patient care by discussing cases that are based on real practice with a small group of fellow clinicians. Discussing various approaches among peers stimulates interest and broadens perspectives as different practitioners may approach clinical and ethical problems in different ways.

The case studies to be discussed are: PVD, toric lenses and post cataract surgery refraction.

Learning objectives:

  • Manage the patient’s expectations when dealing with potential dispensing challenges and explain the options available
  • Select appropriate correction options for patients with anisometropia caused by monocular cataract extraction
  • Suggest suitable contact lens options to manage the correction of anisometropia in presbyopic patients
  • Understand the risks associated with cataract surgery and how to solve the refractive issues encountered following surgery 
  • Manage a patient’s expectations when fitting toric contact lenses
  • Know how to choose and fit suitable soft contact lenses making appropriate adjustments as necessary 
  • Knows how to select the appropriate toric lens for the patient’s needs and parameters 
  • Explain to a patient relevant information regarding PVD in a clear manner and use appropriate written material
  • Understand the risk factors for PVD and retinal detachment
  • Know how to investigate a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment
  • Evaluate and manage a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment

Competencies: Communication, Optical appliances, Contact lenses and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

No description provided

12.45 PM
This is an opportunity to have some lunch, tea/coffee and speak further with fellow attendees and exhibitors.
1.45 PM

This lecture will be lead by an optometrist, an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer and will involve a patient who is visually impaired as a result of AMD. 

The patient will talk about living with AMD and the impact this has on their day-to-day life whilst the Liason Officer will be speaking about the experiences of patients' they work with.

The session will also cover recent research conducted in the Crabb Lab at City, University of London on real-life visual function (face-recognition, visual search and mobility) in patients with dry AMD. It will discuss the symptoms reported by people with dry AMD, in particular relating to how their vision looks and appears in the real world.

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease 

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of the visual impact of AMD and so to be able to explain and reassure appropriately these effects to patients.
  • To improve the understanding of the real-life visual function of patients with AMD and so to be able to advise and support patients with AMD more effectively
  • To improve the understanding of the symptoms experienced by patients with AMD and the impact on their vision and so to be able to investigate these more effectively
  • To improve the management and advice given to patients with AMD by understanding their real-life visual function 

Related content

Speakers

Jane Johns

Patient with AMD

Dr Deanna Taylor MCOptom

Lecturer
City, University of London

Vanessa Camp

Senior Eye Clinic Liaison Officer
York Hospital Trust Sight Support Service

This workshop will combine an element of didactic teaching using projected slides with a hands on practical session. The short talk with slides at the beginning of the workshop is to reacquaint delegates with a technique and part of the eye of which they may have little or no experience. Following this delegates will have an understanding of the indications for carrying out gonioscopy along with an understanding of what they will see whilst carrying out the technique and how to interpret what they see to facilitate the process of grading the anterior chamber angle. The differing techniques used with the two most common forms of gonioscopy lens will be demonstrated, and during a closely supervised hand-on practical session using patients, the delegates will have the opportunity to try both techniques for themselves.

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:  

  • To appreciate the indications for carrying out gonioscopy and patients that are at risk of glaucoma
  • To be able to identify the structures of the anterior chamber angle and to grade the angle and so understand when referral is required
  • To understand how a gonioscopy lens works, the most common types of lens and how to perform the technique.

Related content 

Speakers

Dr Dan Rosser MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 

Related content

Speakers

Dr Irene Ctori MCOptom

Council Member and Senior Lecturer
The College of Optometrists and City, University of London

All peer discussion sessions will cover the same three topics, so you only need to attend one session. 

This peer discussion session will help optometrists improve their standards of patient care by discussing cases that are based on real practice with a small group of fellow clinicians. Discussing various approaches among peers stimulates interest and broadens perspectives as different practitioners may approach clinical and ethical problems in different ways.

The case studies to be discussed are: PVD, toric lenses and post cataract surgery refraction.

Learning objectives:

  • Manage the patient’s expectations when dealing with potential dispensing challenges and explain the options available
  • Select appropriate correction options for patients with anisometropia caused by monocular cataract extraction
  • Suggest suitable contact lens options to manage the correction of anisometropia in presbyopic patients
  • Understand the risks associated with cataract surgery and how to solve the refractive issues encountered following surgery 
  • Manage a patient’s expectations when fitting toric contact lenses
  • Know how to choose and fit suitable soft contact lenses making appropriate adjustments as necessary 
  • Knows how to select the appropriate toric lens for the patient’s needs and parameters 
  • Explain to a patient relevant information regarding PVD in a clear manner and use appropriate written material
  • Understand the risk factors for PVD and retinal detachment
  • Know how to investigate a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment
  • Evaluate and manage a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment

Competencies: Communication, Optical appliances, Contact lenses and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

It’s a super challenge! There are ten patients in your waiting room needing your expert diagnosis but, you only have an hour left of the day. That’s not the worst news either; they are all over 40!  Can you handle the heat? In this fast-paced, interactive discussion workshop you will work alongside your peers as a group to diagnose and manage 10 different patients, with a wide range of symptoms.

This session is independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Speakers

Sarah Long

Professional Affairs Consultant
Johnson & Johnson Vision

No description provided

2.50 PM

Inherited retinal diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the UK working age population. They can be caused by mutations in over 200 genes, with many still undiscovered. Some major advances have occurred in recent years allowing us to find the genetic cause in many patients. Also, novel treatments have been trialled for some conditions, with more being developed. This lecture will aim to give an overview of the following: our current understanding of inherited retinal diseases; key investigations in the hospital eye service; advances in genetic screening; novel treatments, including gene therapy, stem cells, and electronic implants. 
Optometrists will be more aware of how to detect inherited retinopathies, better able to advise patients in terms of management, and will be aware of current avenues of research into new treatments, and can convey this knowledge to their patients.

Competencies covered: Communication, Standards of Practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To be aware of how to detect inherited retinal diseases from history taking and its relevance during the examination
  • To improve understanding of inherited retinal diseases, management in specialist hospital eye services, including advances in imaging and genetic screening, so that relevant information can be given to patients about their condition and appropriate referrals made
  • To improve awareness of novel experimental and approved treatments in inherited retinal disease in order to keep knowledge up to date and so this information can be conveyed to patients 

Speakers

Omar Mahroo

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This workshop will combine an element of didactic teaching using projected slides with a hands on practical session. The short talk with slides at the beginning of the workshop is to reacquaint delegates with a technique and part of the eye of which they may have little or no experience. Following this delegates will have an understanding of the indications for carrying out gonioscopy along with an understanding of what they will see whilst carrying out the technique and how to interpret what they see to facilitate the process of grading the anterior chamber angle. The differing techniques used with the two most common forms of gonioscopy lens will be demonstrated, and during a closely supervised hand-on practical session using patients, the delegates will have the opportunity to try both techniques for themselves.

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:  

  • To appreciate the indications for carrying out gonioscopy and patients that are at risk of glaucoma
  • To be able to identify the structures of the anterior chamber angle and to grade the angle and so understand when referral is required
  • To understand how a gonioscopy lens works, the most common types of lens and how to perform the technique.

Related content 

Speakers

Dr Dan Rosser MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

This workshop is aimed at optometrists of all abilities who want to improve their practical BV skills. Using a combination of short presentations, practical demonstrations and audience participation, the delegates will have the opportunity to evaluate their technique with a variety of tests including cover test and ocular motility. 

The presenter will discuss each of the techniques in turn, demonstrating the optimum method in each case, and then observe as delegates perform the tests on each other and patients. The presenter will be on hand to give one-to-one guidance to the delegates, ensuring that they get the most out of the session.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To have a fresher understanding of the core tests used to assess the binocular vision system in both adults and children such as ocular motor balance and know what normal results to expect for each group
  • To have a fresher understanding of the indications for using a variety of BV tests and know how to relay the results into a patient management plan
  • To have a fresher understanding of the techniques for getting the best results from a selection of tests for BV, to understand when to choose additional tests and how to interpret the results and differentiate patients presenting with incommitant deviations.

Related content 

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Robert Frith Optometrists

All peer discussion sessions will cover the same three topics, so you only need to attend one session. 

This peer discussion session will help optometrists improve their standards of patient care by discussing cases that are based on real practice with a small group of fellow clinicians. Discussing various approaches among peers stimulates interest and broadens perspectives as different practitioners may approach clinical and ethical problems in different ways.

The case studies to be discussed are: PVD, toric lenses and post cataract surgery refraction.

Learning objectives:

  • Manage the patient’s expectations when dealing with potential dispensing challenges and explain the options available
  • Select appropriate correction options for patients with anisometropia caused by monocular cataract extraction
  • Suggest suitable contact lens options to manage the correction of anisometropia in presbyopic patients
  • Understand the risks associated with cataract surgery and how to solve the refractive issues encountered following surgery 
  • Manage a patient’s expectations when fitting toric contact lenses
  • Know how to choose and fit suitable soft contact lenses making appropriate adjustments as necessary 
  • Knows how to select the appropriate toric lens for the patient’s needs and parameters 
  • Explain to a patient relevant information regarding PVD in a clear manner and use appropriate written material
  • Understand the risk factors for PVD and retinal detachment
  • Know how to investigate a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment
  • Evaluate and manage a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment

Competencies: Communication, Optical appliances, Contact lenses and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

No description provided

3.50 PM
This is an opportunity to have some tea/coffee and speak further with fellow attendees and exhibitors.
4.20 PM

This session will utilise case based learning. Four clinical cases related to symptomatic dry eye will be presented and critically appraised. The differential diagnosis, management options will be discussed and evaluated. Current guidelines and research evidence will be considered in each case along with newer future treatment options. 
In addition to the cases, the speaker will provide a broad overview of the definitions and classification of dry eye, its epidemiology, diagnostic methods and its management options at the start of the session.

Target group: Therapeutic optometrist and Optometrist 

Competencies covered: 

Therapeutic optometrist: Knowledge and The healthcare system 

Optometrist: Standards of practice and Ocular disease 

Learning objectives: 

  • Therapeutic optometrists will develop their understanding of dry eye and treatment strategies 
  • Optometrists will be able to know when to recommend OTC or prescribe therapeutics or treatments only when they are clinically indicated, and in the patients best interests
  • Optometrists will be able to recognise common corneal abnormalities and refer when appropriate. 
  • Therapeutic optometrists will understand how to assess the evidence base of an intervention and apply those findings to their own prescribing practice. 

Speakers

Professor Fiona Carley

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 

Related content

Speakers

Dr Irene Ctori MCOptom

Council Member and Senior Lecturer
The College of Optometrists and City, University of London

This workshop is aimed at optometrists of all abilities who want to improve their practical BV skills. Using a combination of short presentations, practical demonstrations and audience participation, the delegates will have the opportunity to evaluate their technique with a variety of tests including cover test and ocular motility. 

The presenter will discuss each of the techniques in turn, demonstrating the optimum method in each case, and then observe as delegates perform the tests on each other and patients. The presenter will be on hand to give one-to-one guidance to the delegates, ensuring that they get the most out of the session.

Competencies covered: Assessment of Visual Function, Binocular Vision

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To have a fresher understanding of the core tests used to assess the binocular vision system in both adults and children such as ocular motor balance and know what normal results to expect for each group
  • To have a fresher understanding of the indications for using a variety of BV tests and know how to relay the results into a patient management plan
  • To have a fresher understanding of the techniques for getting the best results from a selection of tests for BV, to understand when to choose additional tests and how to interpret the results and differentiate patients presenting with incommitant deviations.

Related content 

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Robert Frith Optometrists

All peer discussion sessions will cover the same three topics, so you only need to attend one session. 

This peer discussion session will help optometrists improve their standards of patient care by discussing cases that are based on real practice with a small group of fellow clinicians. Discussing various approaches among peers stimulates interest and broadens perspectives as different practitioners may approach clinical and ethical problems in different ways.

The case studies to be discussed are: PVD, toric lenses and post cataract surgery refraction.

Learning objectives:

  • Manage the patient’s expectations when dealing with potential dispensing challenges and explain the options available
  • Select appropriate correction options for patients with anisometropia caused by monocular cataract extraction
  • Suggest suitable contact lens options to manage the correction of anisometropia in presbyopic patients
  • Understand the risks associated with cataract surgery and how to solve the refractive issues encountered following surgery 
  • Manage a patient’s expectations when fitting toric contact lenses
  • Know how to choose and fit suitable soft contact lenses making appropriate adjustments as necessary 
  • Knows how to select the appropriate toric lens for the patient’s needs and parameters 
  • Explain to a patient relevant information regarding PVD in a clear manner and use appropriate written material
  • Understand the risk factors for PVD and retinal detachment
  • Know how to investigate a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment
  • Evaluate and manage a patient presenting with symptoms of a PVD or retinal detachment

Competencies: Communication, Optical appliances, Contact lenses and Ocular disease

Target group: Optometrist

No description provided

 

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