Assessment of binocular vision in community practice

30 August 2013
Volume 14, Issue 3

This article focuses on the tests used for the detection and measurement of binocular anomalies, many of which can be performed without the need for expensive or sophisticated equipment.

Introduction 

This article discusses how many aspects of binocular vision can be assessed in primary-care optometric practice. Most of the investigations described can be performed without the need for expensive or sophisticated equipment. Community optometrists have an important role to play in the detection and management of binocular vision anomalies. The current article is focused on the tests used for the detection and measurement of binocular anomalies. The optometric management of these anomalies falls largely outside the scope of the article. 

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