Methods of measurement of the anterior chamber angle: Part 2

16 December 2013
Volume 14, Issue 4

Significant and irreversible optic neuropathy, and impairment of visual function, can occur within a short period following an episode of angle closure.

Introduction 

Angle closure glaucoma (ACG) is a major cause of visual morbidity worldwide (Quigley and Broman 2006). Significant and irreversible optic neuropathy, and impairment of visual function, can occur within a short period following an episode of angle closure (Aung et al. 2001). The first article in this series (Dabasia et al. 2013) considered the definitions/classification, epidemiology and risk factors for ACG. Assessment of the anterior chamber angle by gonioscopy and management options were also discussed. Gonioscopy is considered the current reference standard to evaluate the configuration of the anterior chamber angle, but it is not a technique that is widely adopted in community optometric practice. Instead, optometrists tend to use surrogate methods, particularly slit-lamp biomicroscope-based techniques, or the more recently available imaging-based technologies. This article will review current literature on traditional slit-lamp techniques to screen for the condition, with imaging-based technologies forming the subject of the final article in this series.

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