Refractive lens exchange for high myopia: Case report

16 December 2013
Volume 14, Issue 4

A 41-year-old male attended for a consultation for refractive surgery following referral from his optician. He wanted to know 'if anything could be done' for his prescription.

Introduction 

A 41-year-old male attended for a consultation for refractive surgery following referral from his optician. He wanted to know ‘if anything could be done’ for his prescription. He was informed by his optician that there were surgical options available to treat his prescription; however, even after surgery he may still need spectacles for certain tasks. The patient was still keen. He had always found his spectacles to be heavy and uncomfortable and wanted to be able to have more freedom to manage without them. He had tried contact lenses but found them difficult to apply and he had ultimately decided to stop wearing them.

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