Vision and sport - Madaline Rolph

Many children and young people would like to wear contact lenses to help them make the most of their sport and other leisure activities. Madaline Rolph started wearing contact lenses for sports when she was 11, following advice from her optometrist.

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The patient

Madaline started wearing contact lenses for sports when she was 11, following advice from her optometrist, Parth Shah, optometrist and director of Scotts Opticians in Norfolk. She has found that they are very comfortable and convenient for her when competing.

Madaline says; “My brother had been using contact lenses when playing football for a while, so when I turned 11, my optometrist suggested to my parents that I try them for running. I had seen my brother use them so was happy to give them a go and it was very successful. I’m a sprinter, so don’t have the time to push my glasses up when I’m in a very short race. With my contacts I can see so clearly and it doesn’t affect my performance”.

Madaline Rolph
Athlete and swimmer

Madaline Rolph is a longsighted athlete and swimmer, whose favourite event is the 100 metre sprint. She is 13 and runs with Thetford Athletics Club.

 

The optometrist

"Madaline is a sprinter and has a high hyperopic prescription, which means she has trouble with focussing on objects that are close, so I recommended to her parents that she try contact lenses when she turned 11. She mentioned that her glasses interfered with her sport. In my experience, this is one of the most common reasons why parents ask for contact lenses for their children. Contact lenses have really advanced in the last five years and they are now far more comfortable and, more importantly, breathable, which is much better for the overall health of the eye. Whilst not suitable for everyone, there are very few people nowadays who cannot be fitted for contact lenses, including children. I would certainly recommend considering them if you are involved in sport and need corrective eye wear."

Dr Parth Shah BSc(Hons) PhD MCOptom
Trustee, Council member - Eastern

Parth graduated with a First-class honours degree in Optometry in 2002. After a year in community practice, he returned to Aston University to complete his PhD investigating the epidemiology of myopia in UK school children. He also  worked in a supervisory role and as a clinical tutor, overseeing final year undergraduate teaching clinics and assessments.

After completing his doctorate, Parth worked as a strategy consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers in London. He returned to optometry in 2010 and worked as a locum and secondary grader of diabetic retinopathy at Homerton Hospital, London.

Parth now has his own independent practice in East Anglia. He is also a vision consultant to a professional football club in London. 

E: parth.shah@college-optometrists.org

 

Note to editors

  1. Previously known as ophthalmic opticians, optometrists are trained professionals who examine eyes, test sight, give advice on visual problems, and prescribe and dispense spectacles or contact lenses. They also recommend other treatments or visual aids where appropriate. Optometrists are trained to recognise eye diseases, referring such cases as necessary, and can also use or supply various eye drugs.
  2. Optometrists study at university for at least three years and participate in a full year of training and supervision, called the pre-registration year, before qualifying. Once qualified, they have the opportunity to develop their interests in specialist aspects of practice such as contact lenses, treating eye diseases, low vision, children’s vision and sports vision.
  3. For information and advice about how to look after your eyes visit: www.lookafteryoureyes.org
  4. The letters FCOptom or MCOptom after an optometrist’s name means that he or she is a fellow or member of the College of Optometrists.Membership of the College shows their commitment to the very highest clinical, ethical and professional standards, so look for these letters to see if your optometrist is a member.
  5. Please email Ann-Marie Gannon, PR Manager, for further information and copies of photos: ann-marie.gannon@college-optometrists.org or call 020 7766 4342.

 

 

Whilst not suitable for everyone, there are very few people nowadays who cannot be fitted for contact lenses, including children. I would certainly recommend considering them if you are involved in sport and need corrective eye wear.

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