Optometry practice in the UK in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic

CET
1
7 July 2021
Volume 22, Issue 2

This article summarises the key findings of a survey taken by members of the College of Optometrists investigating changes in clinical optometric practice in the UK as a result of the pandemic including the challenges and benefits identified.

Domains covered

Communication Clinical practice

Abstract

To minimise the spread of COVID-19 during the pandemic, optometric practices had to restructure their service provision in order to provide a safe eyecare environment for their patients. These changes included the introduction of new pathways, enhanced infection control procedures, changes to assessment routines and greater use of remote consultations. Nagra et al. recently published a paper detailing the results of a survey conducted on practising members of the College of Optometrists investigating changes in clinical optometric practice in the UK as a result of the pandemic. This article summarises the key findings of the survey including the challenges and benefits identified, such as how to ensure safe working practices, how to continue to provide a comprehensive service and navigation of the financial implications. Benefits such as refined pathways, streamlined services, increased skill acquisition and improved professional relationships are also highlighted. The impact on current practice and implications for future clinical care are also discussed.

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