Myopia progression: can we control it?

1 March 2013
Volume 14, Issue 1

Should we be attempting to control myopia progression in a clinical setting? And,if so, what are the options?

Introduction

Many more children suffer from myopia than was the case 50 years ago: in parts of Asia, over 70% of children are now myopic and require some form of refractive correction to see clearly. A vast literature on possible causes of myopia and methods for controlling myopia progression has built up over the years and, until recently, distinguishing between hypothesis and real evidence has posed a significant challenge. Recent clinical trials of a variety of methods for controlling myopia progression have shown encouraging results and several methods are becoming commercially available. This article addresses the question: should we now be attempting to control myopia progression in a clinical setting? If so, what are the options?

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Related further reading

Here we summarise three research papers from a recent issue of Optometry in Practice.

A framework for delivering eye care to children in special schools aims to help those who often seek treatment the least, writes Anna Scott.

Adrian O’Dowd asks if the growing use of topography in community optometry will lead to wavefront analysis gaining traction as a complementary tool.