Optometry Tomorrow 2020

Date:

23 – 24 February 2020 Add to calendar

Location:

Telford International Centre, St Quentin Gate
Telford
TF3 4JH

Conference CET 16

 

  

 

About

Welcome to the UK's leading optometry event! 

If you are looking to gain your interactive CET points for the cycle, stay up-to-date with developments in your profession and get to grips with the latest clinical innovations and techniques, look no further than Optometry Tomorrow 2020. The conference takes place Sunday 23 - Monday 24 February at the Telford International Centre. 
  • In 2019, Optometry Tomorrow attracted nearly 700 UK optometrists, keen and enthusiastic to learn and engage.
  • 99% said they would consider attending Optometry Tomorrow in the future.

50% discount ends Thursday 31 October

Speakers at the conference include; Kam Balaggan, Simon Frackiewicz, Dr Greg Heath and many more. Click here to see the full list. The conference programme will include, BV, foreign bodies, OCT workshops, glaucoma, gonioscopy and a therapeutics stream. The full programme is now live and can be viewed here

Click here for full terms and conditions. 

Two day member tickets from £170. Click here for full ticket information

Programme

Click here to download a PDF version of the programme. 

Please note you can manually amend your sessions up until 5pm on Friday 7 February. After that time you will need to call the Events Team on 020 7766 4347/4377.

Sorry, no sessions were found matching your filters.

8.00 AM

No description provided

9.15 AM

No description provided

9.35 AM
This talk covers glaucoma medical therapy and the issue with generic prescription so optometrist can understand how their patients are being treated and can communicate with patients better. It covers the newest topical medication imerging onto the market and the potential shift of SLT laser as first line therapy (Light trial). Attendees will be informed on the advancement in glaucoma surgical training. Newer microvasive glaucoma surgery and their place in the glaucoma continuum. Advancement has also been made in the severe complicated end of glaucoma as well as IOP monitoring

Speakers

Leon Au

Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital

More information to follow

Speakers

Paul Ursell

Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

No description provided

Speakers

Rachel Thomas

Principal Optometrist
Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Not only can a poorly fitting pair of glasses cause a child discomfort, but in the worst possible cases, disfigurement or even a permanent reduction in their visual outcome. In this hands-on workshop, participants will look at 3 paediatric case studies and, using 3D printed model heads, take the appropriate measurements, dispense the most suitable frame and lenses and adjust the frames as necessary. Delegates will learn:
  • The key points to consider when dispensing to children and what frames and lenses are most suitable. 
  • How to adjust paediatric frames in order to give the best possible fit.
  • What to do when a standard pair of glasses does not give a satisfactory fit. 

Speakers

Jessica Gowing

Senior Dispensing Optician
Great Ormond Street Hospital

A short lecture will take place on managing a patient presenting with a suspected ocular foreign body. A hands-on session will follow where attendees can practice removing embedded foreign bodies from synthetic eyes using sterile needles at the slit lamp. This will improve the skills of the attendees to allow safe management of these patients in the community.

Speakers

Malcolm McPherson MCOptom

Sessions in the IP stream are primarily aimed at optometrists who have, or are studying towards the therapeutics qualifications. 

Speakers

Dr Karen French MCOptom

An interactive session based around an “escape room in a box” format. Designed to educate through enjoyment. It’s main purpose is to educate practitioners of the benefits of silicone hydrogel daily disposable contact lenses vs other modalities and materials. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

The session covers the latest guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence on managing cataracts in adults aged 18 and over. The workshop aims to improve care before, during and after cataract surgery by optimising service, referral and surgical management, and reducing complications. It also covers the availability of information for people with cataracts before, during and after cataract surgery.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

10.40 AM

The lecture will start by describing what to assess when examining a patient who presents with a potential optic nerve problem. Emphasis will be on history taking, clinical features and techniques that are used to assess the patient’s optic nerve. This will be highlighted with the use of case examples of patients seen in clinic.

The talk will include referral guidance, including how urgently to refer based on the clinical findings.
 

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand the importance of history taking in patients presenting with possible optic nerve problems
  • To understand the different examination techniques used for patients presenting with possible optic nerve problems 
  • To understand how urgently to refer patients presenting with possible optic problems 

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease, Standards of practice and Ocular examination 

Speakers

Dr Greg Heath

Consultant Medical Ophthalmologist
York Hospital

More information to follow

Speakers

Tomas Burke

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Bristol Eye Hospital

No description provided

Speakers

Rachel Thomas

Principal Optometrist
Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

No description provided

Speakers

Rachel Pointon MCOptom

Optometrist

A short lecture will take place on managing a patient presenting with a suspected ocular foreign body. A hands-on session will follow where attendees can practice removing embedded foreign bodies from synthetic eyes using sterile needles at the slit lamp. This will improve the skills of the attendees to allow safe management of these patients in the community.

Speakers

Malcolm McPherson MCOptom

Sessions in the IP stream are primarily aimed at optometrists who have, or are studying towards the therapeutics qualifications. 

Speakers

Sophie Harper FCOptom DipTP(IP)

Lead Assessor
College of Optometrists

The feedback loop for referrals from optometry into ophthalmology seems to be an eternal conundrum for both professions. In the absence of feedback, referrals seldom improve without local initiatives around training and communication. This talk will provide insightful and, at times amusing, insight about our referrals (all anonymous of course) – the good, bad and the ugly – and most importantly the true picture of what exactly happens next. Attending this lecture will improve your understanding of the value of an appropriate referral.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

The session covers the latest guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence on managing cataracts in adults aged 18 and over. The workshop aims to improve care before, during and after cataract surgery by optimising service, referral and surgical management, and reducing complications. It also covers the availability of information for people with cataracts before, during and after cataract surgery

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

11.40 AM

No description provided

12.05 PM

This lecture will use a series of patient cases to cover a range of binocular vision anomalies presenting in adults. The presenter will lead the audience from the initial presenting signs and symptoms, through an appropriate investigation ending with the best management plan. It will discuss differential diagnosis, clinical pearls and what to watch out for along the way.

The patients cover a range of types of binocular vision anomalies, both longstanding and of recent onset, such as convergance insufficiency, abnormal retinal correspondance and a case of a superior oblique palsy.

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the understanding of the questions required to follow up on the symptoms of adults presenting with a possible binocular vision anomaly.
  • To understand the most appropriate investigations to carry out on an adult presenting with symptoms of a binocular vision anomaly and interpret the results to understand their binocular vision status.
  • To improve the understanding of the management of adults presenting with a binocular vision anomaly and to differentiate between those that can be managed in practice and those that require referring.
  • To be able to identify, manage and refer appropriately adults presenting with an incomitant deviation.

Target group: Optometrist

Competencies covered: Communication and Binocular vision

Speakers

Dr Miriam Conway

Senior Lecturer
City University

  • By the end of the session delegates will be able to describe:
  • What is learning disability?
  • What visual problems do people with LD have?
  • How might we detect visual problems in someone with LD?
  • What do people with LD think about sight tests?
  • Creating a good experience for patient carer and yourself
  • What else can I offer a patient with LD and visual problems?
  • NHS England Special Schools Eye Care Programme – how can I get involved?

Speakers

Rachel Pilling

No description provided

Speakers

Aravind Reddy

No description provided

Speakers

Angela Whitaker MCOptom

Senior Lecturer
Cardiff University

In the UK there is an estimated 7,300 new cases of retinal detachment every year and many patients will present with flashes and floaters to Optometrists in the primary care setting. The biggest cause of a retinal detachment is from a posterior vitreous detachment which occurs mostly between the 5th and 7th decade of life. This skills workshop will supplement the previous lecture on PVDs and retinal tears by further focusing on the practical and systematic approach to the assessment and management of the patient who presents with flashes and floaters. Particular emphasis will be made on the how to properly perform dynamic vitreous and Weiss ring assessments in order to detect PVDs and Schaffer’s sign. Most of the workshop will be dedicated to practicing the essential practical skills required specifically for peripheral retinal examination to detect and not miss retinal breaks in all patients. Discussion will also focus on how to differentiate the various types of retinal breaks (including acute versus chronic breaks, atrophic round holes, horseshoe tears, operculated tears, retinal dialyses, and giant retinal tears) and how to differentiate those breaks that require urgent treatment from those that can merely be observed. Optometrists will have opportunity to examine several patients with signs of PVD and retinal detachments and so should feel confident in investigating and appropriately managing patients that present with symptoms of flashes and floaters after this workshop.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination 

Target audience: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the advice given when patients present with flashes and floaters, so optometrists are able to communicate appropriate advice and explain the referral pathway 
  • To understand the risk factors for Retinal Detachment and PVD 
  • To be able to develop a management plan for the investigation of the patient with symtoms of retinal detachment by using dilation, direct slit lamp and volk examination ensuring appropriate referral
  • To improve the skills when examining patients with an indirect ophthalmoscope looking for signs of a retinal detachment

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

Consultant in Vitreoretinal Surgery, Medical Retina and Cataracts
Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary

Sessions in the IP stream are primarily aimed at optometrists who have, or are studying towards the therapeutics qualifications. 

Speakers

Dr Nav Chana

National Clinical Director
National Association of Primary Care

Presbyopia focused communication workshop, with either videos of patients or live patients discussing their experience of becoming presbyopic. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

An interactive discussion session centred around 3 case scenarios, allowing delegates to discuss a patient management plan for each one.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

1.05 PM

No description provided

2.05 PM
More details to follow
Same day bilateral cataract surgery has been taboo but there is firm evidence that this is safe and very advantageous for all stakeholders provided some essential rules are adhered to.  The practice has gained acceptance and popularity in a small number of countries.  It is important for optometrists as primary eye care providers to be up to date and be at the forefront of this wave, in order to provide the best advice to patients.  
It is important that each of the two eyes bear visually significant cataracts.  High risk or complex cases should be avoided.  Each operation must be treated as a separate operation with new gloves and gowns, and a new set of instruments, to reduce the risk of cross contamination.  There is also the option not to proceed should the first eye cataract surgery had not gone completely well.  The concept of conditional probability will be discussed.
 

Speakers

Professor Christopher Liu

Honorary Clinical Professor, Senior Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon and Medical Director
Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Tongdean Eye Clinic

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 

Speakers

Dr Irene Ctori MCOptom

Council Member and Senior Lecturer
The College of Optometrists and City, University of London

No description provided

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Robert Frith Optometrists

In the UK there is an estimated 7,300 new cases of retinal detachment every year and many patients will present with flashes and floaters to Optometrists in the primary care setting. The biggest cause of a retinal detachment is from a posterior vitreous detachment which occurs mostly between the 5th and 7th decade of life. This skills workshop will supplement the previous lecture on PVDs and retinal tears by further focusing on the practical and systematic approach to the assessment and management of the patient who presents with flashes and floaters. Particular emphasis will be made on the how to properly perform dynamic vitreous and Weiss ring assessments in order to detect PVDs and Schaffer’s sign. Most of the workshop will be dedicated to practicing the essential practical skills required specifically for peripheral retinal examination to detect and not miss retinal breaks in all patients. Discussion will also focus on how to differentiate the various types of retinal breaks (including acute versus chronic breaks, atrophic round holes, horseshoe tears, operculated tears, retinal dialyses, and giant retinal tears) and how to differentiate those breaks that require urgent treatment from those that can merely be observed. Optometrists will have opportunity to examine several patients with signs of PVD and retinal detachments and so should feel confident in investigating and appropriately managing patients that present with symptoms of flashes and floaters after this workshop.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination 

Target audience: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the advice given when patients present with flashes and floaters, so optometrists are able to communicate appropriate advice and explain the referral pathway 
  • To understand the risk factors for Retinal Detachment and PVD 
  • To be able to develop a management plan for the investigation of the patient with symtoms of retinal detachment by using dilation, direct slit lamp and volk examination ensuring appropriate referral
  • To improve the skills when examining patients with an indirect ophthalmoscope looking for signs of a retinal detachment

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

Consultant in Vitreoretinal Surgery, Medical Retina and Cataracts
Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary

Sessions in the IP stream are primarily aimed at optometrists who have, or are studying towards the therapeutics qualifications. 

Community IP can be challenging. 
Case management reflects, not just clinical guidelines, but patient expectations and the unique circumstances of each case. These uncontrollable variables will influence management.
The most appropriate decisions may not, in the clinician’s expert opinion, necessarily follow official guidelines of classic management for diagnosed entities. Patient expectations will impact on what is considered to be in the patient’s best interests.
With real case examples, particular management strategies will be discussed and debated with delegates. Delegate participation is anticipated. If alterative managements are proposed these need to be supported by consideration of the singular presentation; it may not be appropriate to simply restate structured guidelines. 
It is anticipated, via the interactive voting pads, an enthusiastic dialogue will demonstrate the diversity of management needs in the community.
 

Speakers

Dr Peter Frampton

Medical Optometrist
Aaron Optometrists

The feedback loop for referrals from optometry into ophthalmology seems to be an eternal conundrum for both professions. In the absence of feedback, referrals seldom improve without local initiatives around training and communication. This talk will provide insightful and, at times amusing, insight about our referrals (all anonymous of course) – the good, bad and the ugly – and most importantly the true picture of what exactly happens next. Attending this lecture will improve your understanding of the value of an appropriate referral.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Please note this session is only open to College supervisors and is repeated from Optometry Tomorrow 2018

This session will help pre-registration supervisors understand how to become more effective supervisors in a busy practice. The seminar will review good practice in the taking of a history from a patient. It will consider how to be assured of the standard of trainees, in particular sampling and observing the trainee.
Using a real life scenario we will prepare feedback and consider with our peers how to discuss with a trainee how to improve.

Competencies covered: Communication and Standards of practice

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To consider the content, approach and method of obtaining a relevant history and symptoms
  • To consider and understand how as supervisors we can be assured of the quality of our trainee’s work, to ensure a good standard of patient care
  • To understand how to observe a real history taking and consider how to give effective feedback to trainees and so to be able to intervene if necessary.

Speakers

Ruth Bennett MCOptom

No description provided

3.10 PM

This session will include a brief overview of different types of headache and how they present. The main focus will be migraines. There will be a review of “eye signs” in headache patients. There will be review of idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

More information to follow

Speakers

Dr Benjamin Wakerley

Consultant Neurologist
Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

More information to follow

Speakers

Suresh Munyal MCOptom

Professor Jeremy Guggenheim MCOptom

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 

Speakers

Dr Irene Ctori MCOptom

Council Member and Senior Lecturer
The College of Optometrists and City, University of London

No description provided

Speakers

Simon Frackiewicz MCOptom

Optometrist/Orthoptist
Robert Frith Optometrists

In the UK there is an estimated 7,300 new cases of retinal detachment every year and many patients will present with flashes and floaters to Optometrists in the primary care setting. The biggest cause of a retinal detachment is from a posterior vitreous detachment which occurs mostly between the 5th and 7th decade of life. This skills workshop will supplement the previous lecture on PVDs and retinal tears by further focusing on the practical and systematic approach to the assessment and management of the patient who presents with flashes and floaters. Particular emphasis will be made on the how to properly perform dynamic vitreous and Weiss ring assessments in order to detect PVDs and Schaffer’s sign. Most of the workshop will be dedicated to practicing the essential practical skills required specifically for peripheral retinal examination to detect and not miss retinal breaks in all patients. Discussion will also focus on how to differentiate the various types of retinal breaks (including acute versus chronic breaks, atrophic round holes, horseshoe tears, operculated tears, retinal dialyses, and giant retinal tears) and how to differentiate those breaks that require urgent treatment from those that can merely be observed. Optometrists will have opportunity to examine several patients with signs of PVD and retinal detachments and so should feel confident in investigating and appropriately managing patients that present with symptoms of flashes and floaters after this workshop.

Competencies covered: Communication, Ocular disease and Ocular examination 

Target audience: Optometrist

Learning objectives: 

  • To improve the advice given when patients present with flashes and floaters, so optometrists are able to communicate appropriate advice and explain the referral pathway 
  • To understand the risk factors for Retinal Detachment and PVD 
  • To be able to develop a management plan for the investigation of the patient with symtoms of retinal detachment by using dilation, direct slit lamp and volk examination ensuring appropriate referral
  • To improve the skills when examining patients with an indirect ophthalmoscope looking for signs of a retinal detachment

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

Consultant in Vitreoretinal Surgery, Medical Retina and Cataracts
Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary

Sessions in the IP stream are primarily aimed at optometrists who have, or are studying towards the therapeutics qualifications. 

From this session delegates will learn: 

- Why clinical audit is important for IP optometrists

- What to include in a clinical audit

- An example of audit in practice 

Speakers

Pamela Robertson MCOptom

IP Optometrist
Angus Optix Ltd

Discussion workshop looking at how we can maximise different patient’s satisfaction throughout life by considering the balance of contact lens material properties as lifestyle changes. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

4.10 PM

No description provided

4.35 PM
More information to follow

Speakers

Dr Gordon Hay

Senior Ophthalmic Specialist: Ocular Oncology Service
Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

More information to follow

Speakers

Rebecca Ford

No description provided

Speakers

Aravind Reddy

No description provided

Speakers

Rachel Pointon MCOptom

Optometrist

No description provided

Speakers

Angela Whitaker MCOptom

Senior Lecturer
Cardiff University

No description provided

This workshop focuses on practical tips for fitting the next generation of extended depth of focus contact lenses such as NaturalVue Multifocal 1 Day Contact Lenses. These lens designs are very different from traditional center near or center distance lenses, and can be ideal for both presbyopia and paediatric myopia management. Learn clinical pearls, ideal patients for these types of lenses and practical tips to successfully use them in your practice.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

5.35 PM

This is an excellent opportunity for you to:
-    network and engage after the first day of the conference
-    talk about your highlights from the day
-    speak to exhibitors
-    gain app challenge points.

The reception is included in your ticket and drinks and nibbles will be provided. You will be able to mix with other delegates, presenters, exhibitors, College Council members and staff in a relaxed and informal environment.

No description provided

No description provided

Sorry, no sessions were found matching your filters.

8.00 AM

No description provided

9.00 AM
This lecture will describe the recognition of the common inherited dystrophies of the cornea and anterior segment. The common changes that can mimic inherited corneal disease will be described. A pathway for management and referral will be provided.
An understanding of the mechanisms and mode of inheritance will be given such that a knowledge-based discussion can be had with patients about the nature and prognosis of their disease.
 

Speakers

Stephen Tuft

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Moorfields Eye Hospital

Delegates will learn: 

  • Clinical features of blunt trauma to the eye
  • Features and management of ciliochoroidal detachment 
  • Surgical management of intraocular pressure 
     

Speakers

Rani Sebastian

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Bristol Eye Hospital

Michael Tang MCOptom

Medical Optometrist
Bristol Eye Hospital

This session will support optometrists to have confidence in managing difficult conversations with patients. The session will consider and reflect on both the patients experience and perspective as well as the optometrists own. The overarching skills and knowledge helpful in such situations, which the session will explore, are:
•    Our capacity for empathy
•    The context of the patients lived experience
•    The implications of difficult conversations triggering change for the patient
•    The negative and positive story one has about oneself
•    The power of questions as a catalyst for change
These skills and knowledge will support optometry professionals to put the care, well-being and safety of patients first as well as be accountable and personally responsible for their own practice. 
 

Speakers

Ian Trimmer

Clinical Practitioner

This workshop will combine an element of didactic teaching using projected slides with a hands on practical session. The short talk with slides at the beginning of the workshop is to reacquaint delegates with a technique and part of the eye of which they may have little or no experience. Following this delegates will have an understanding of the indications for carrying out gonioscopy along with an understanding of what they will see whilst carrying out the technique and how to interpret what they see to facilitate the process of grading the anterior chamber angle. The differing techniques used with the two most common forms of gonioscopy lens will be demonstrated, and during a closely supervised hand-on practical session using patients, the delegates will have the opportunity to try both techniques for themselves.

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:  

  • To appreciate the indications for carrying out gonioscopy and patients that are at risk of glaucoma
  • To be able to identify the structures of the anterior chamber angle and to grade the angle and so understand when referral is required
  • To understand how a gonioscopy lens works, the most common types of lens and how to perform the technique.

This workshop is being repeated from Optometry Tomorrow 2019. If you attended this workshop you won't be able to get the CET points again. 

Speakers

Dr Dan Rosser MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

This workshop will consist of patients that have pathology or unusual features to the anterior part of the eye. The delegate will be expected to use the slit lamp to diagnose the condition/pathology and use diagnostic drugs if needed to aid the assessment. The aim is to have 18 delegates with 5 patients and 5 slit lamps, meaning there will be four slit lamps with 3 delegates per slit lamp and one slit lamp with 4 delegates. There will be a facilitator per slit lamp and the delegates will rotate around each of the patients so that they have an opportunity to use the slit lamp and detect pathology. Background information will be provided on each patient, and the delegate would be expected to make a diagnosis using the appropriate technique at the slit lamp. This workshop tests the slit lamp skills of the delegate, along with how to detect certain types of conditions such as narrow angles and how these patients are at risk of closed angle glaucoma. The delegate would be expected to perform certain techniques on the slit lamp such as conical beam and parallelopiped, and we will either teach them techniques or refresh their memory in terms of the techniques they would use when looking at certain structures anteriorly.
This workshop is to help develop the skill of using the slit lamp more effectively as well as a session to pathology, management and investigative techniques.

Speakers

Shamina Asif MCOptom

No description provided

Discussion workshop looking at how we can maximise different patient’s satisfaction throughout life by considering the balance of contact lens material properties as lifestyle changes. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

The session provides guidance for community optometrists on conducting cataract post-op assessments, covering equipment required, what to look out for during the eye examination, complications and recommended course of action. Attendees also can choose to join the SpaMedica Cataract Post-op Scheme to manage post-op assessments.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

With 50% of the world forecasted to be myopic by 2050, myopia management is an area of intense interest. One of the biggest challenges practitioners have is successfully implementing myopia management into their practice. This lecture focuses on how to engage your entire staff and practice to offer myopia management services, without disrupting your full scope practice.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

10.05 AM
This talk will cover the key principles for the evaluation of uveitis and how modern technologies including multimodal imaging and artificial intelligence are radically changing the basis for our treatment decisions. 
This will support standards through improving diagnosis and evaluation of this sight-threatening group of diseases – particularly through improving the understanding of the nature of uveitis and the relation of the underlying disease process to the clinical manifestations, differentiating disease manifestations and their relevance, and providing a state-of-the-art update on the use of quantitative imaging to enhance clinical evaluation in uveitis.

Speakers

Professor Alastair Denniston

Consultant Ophthalmologist
University Hospitals Birmingham NHSFT, University of Birmingham

Delegates in this session will learn:

  • the short and long term complications of corneal grafting 
  • how therapeutic lasers make corneal grafting better
  • how to avoid needing a graft in the first place 

Speakers

Daniel Gore

Consultant ophthalmologist
Moorfields Eye Hospital

This session will support optometrists to have confidence in managing difficult conversations with patients. The session will consider and reflect on both the patients experience and perspective as well as the optometrists own. The overarching skills and knowledge helpful in such situations, which the session will explore, are:

•    Our capacity for empathy
•    The context of the patients lived experience
•    The implications of difficult conversations triggering change for the patient
•    The negative and positive story one has about oneself
•    The power of questions as a catalyst for change
These skills and knowledge will support optometry professionals to put the care, well-being and safety of patients first as well as be accountable and personally responsible for their own practice. 

Speakers

Ian Trimmer

Clinical Practitioner

This workshop will combine an element of didactic teaching using projected slides with a hands on practical session. The short talk with slides at the beginning of the workshop is to reacquaint delegates with a technique and part of the eye of which they may have little or no experience. Following this delegates will have an understanding of the indications for carrying out gonioscopy along with an understanding of what they will see whilst carrying out the technique and how to interpret what they see to facilitate the process of grading the anterior chamber angle. The differing techniques used with the two most common forms of gonioscopy lens will be demonstrated, and during a closely supervised hand-on practical session using patients, the delegates will have the opportunity to try both techniques for themselves.

Competencies covered: Ocular Disease, Ocular Examination

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:  

  • To appreciate the indications for carrying out gonioscopy and patients that are at risk of glaucoma
  • To be able to identify the structures of the anterior chamber angle and to grade the angle and so understand when referral is required
  • To understand how a gonioscopy lens works, the most common types of lens and how to perform the technique.

This workshop is being repeated from Optometry Tomorrow 2019. If you attended this workshop you won't be able to get the CET points again. 

Speakers

Dr Dan Rosser MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

This workshop will consist of patients that have pathology or unusual features to the anterior part of the eye. The delegate will be expected to use the slit lamp to diagnose the condition/pathology and use diagnostic drugs if needed to aid the assessment. The aim is to have 18 delegates with 5 patients and 5 slit lamps, meaning there will be four slit lamps with 3 delegates per slit lamp and one slit lamp with 4 delegates. There will be a facilitator per slit lamp and the delegates will rotate around each of the patients so that they have an opportunity to use the slit lamp and detect pathology. Background information will be provided on each patient, and the delegate would be expected to make a diagnosis using the appropriate technique at the slit lamp. This workshop tests the slit lamp skills of the delegate, along with how to detect certain types of conditions such as narrow angles and how these patients are at risk of closed angle glaucoma. The delegate would be expected to perform certain techniques on the slit lamp such as conical beam and parallelopiped, and we will either teach them techniques or refresh their memory in terms of the techniques they would use when looking at certain structures anteriorly.
This workshop is to help develop the skill of using the slit lamp more effectively as well as a session to pathology, management and investigative techniques.

Speakers

Shamina Asif MCOptom

No description provided

Few optometrists and pharmacists have a working relationship in the course of their professional practice in the community, but it may surprise you to learn how much eye care advice your local pharmacist provides every day, and to how many people. In many areas, pharmacists are encouraged to be the first point of reference for minor ailments, eyes included, and so a good working relationship that facilitates inter-disciplinary referral routes is an area for development on both sides. Tania will provide unique insight into the true picture of what happens in community pharmacy and suggest ways to reach out to your fellow professionals in health care. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

An interactive discussion session centred around 3 case scenarios, allowing delegates to discuss a patient management plan for each one.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

11.05 AM

No description provided

11.30 AM
In the UK there is an estimated 7,300 new cases of retinal detachment every year and many patients will present with flashes and floaters to Optometrists in the primary care setting. Retinal detachments are caused most commonly by retinal tears, atrophic round holes and retinal dialyses.  These comprise a group of lesions classified as peripheral vitreoretinal disorders (PrVDs). The focus of this lecture will be to fully educate community/hospital optometrists regarding all important peripheral disorders, including those considered high risk for RD as well as low risk lesions. The following will be specifically covered:
  • Classification of PrVDs
  • How to correctly examine for PrVDs
  • Listing all common PrVDs
  • How to correctly make the important distinction between retinal tears, operculated tears and atrophic round holes, and their significance
  • Giant retinal tears
  • Retinal Dialyses
  • Acute versus chronic retinal detachments and their relation to referral critera
  • Microcystoid degeneration
  • Differentiating degenerative retinoschisis from chronic retinal detachment
  • Lattice and snowflake degeneration
  • Benign disorders: pavingstone, peripheral drusen, reticular
  • Suggested referral criteria for all common PrVDs

Speakers

Kam Balaggan

Consultant in Vitreoretinal Surgery, Medical Retina and Cataracts
Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary

The presentation describes two common laser interventions for glaucoma and related conditions: Laser Peripheral Iridotomy, and Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty. The talk predicts an increased need for these treatments in the future and discusses whether optometrists are appropriate clinicians to perform these treatments. The treatments and associated indications and techniques are described along with their relative efficacies and potential side effects. The talk also reviews the issues of competency and consent as they pertain to non-medical healthcare professionals performing such treatments.
Glaucoma is a common condition and it is important that optometrists understand and can discuss with their patients, the treatments that may be offered after referral.
The appreciation of the techniques for performing these treatments is important as these treatments are delivered using slit-lamp based equipment and optometrists possess many of the relevant skills required.
Where a non-medical heathcare professional performs a treatment usually performed by a doctor, it is vital that all process are in place to ensure that that clinician is competent to perform that treatment and is working in a way that is consistent with all relevant guidance, standards and legislation.
 

Speakers

Dr Dan Rosser MCOptom

Principal Optometrist
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

No description provided

Speakers

Tomas Burke

Consultant Ophthalmologist
Bristol Eye Hospital

No description provided

Speakers

Andrew Miller MCOptom

Lead Optometrist
Focus Birmingham

In this session delegates will learn: 

  • Relevant history taking for an infant 
  • Age appropriate assessment tests and tips
  • Management of paediatric cases based on findings 

More information to follow 

Speakers

Suzanne Fraser MCOptom

Paediatric Optometrist
Bristol Eye Hospital

No description provided

Presbyopia focused communication workshop, with either videos of patients or live patients discussing their experience of becoming presbyopic. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

Myopia management is rapidly becoming an area of significant clinical and commercial interest. This session summarizes the latest research on various treatments for myopia management, clinical results from commercially available products and what the future holds for new products in this area.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

12.30 PM

No description provided

1.35 PM

No description provided

1.40 PM
More information coming soon 

No description provided

No description provided

2.45 PM

No description provided

3.15 PM

No description provided

3.45 PM

Angle closure glaucoma is a blinding disease (1 out of 4 people). Optometrists can pick up angle closure by simple slit lamp examination by assessing the peripheral limbal chamber depth and then refer for confirmation by gonioscopy. Patients can be treated by laser, lens extraction or drops to open the angle and reduce the IOP and prevent sight loss. 

Learning objectives: 

  • To understand the concepts of Van Herrick estimation and gonioscopy 
  • To understand the definition and prevalence of angle closure glaucoma 
  • To understand the risk factors for angle closure 
  • To understand the role of laser iridotomy and lense extraction in angle closure

Competencies covered: Ocular examination and ocular disease. 

Speakers

Saurabh Goyal

Consultant Ophthalmologist
St Thomas' Hospital

More information to follow

Speakers

Caroline Holden

Freelance Specialist teacher-assessor – specific learning difficulties
Board member SpLD Assessment Standards Committee (SASC)

Dr Jim Gilchrist FCOptom

Former Optometrist & Academic
School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Bradford

No description provided

Speakers

Mike Horler MCOptom

Optometrist
Sussex Eye Hospital

This session is aimed at delegates who are new to OCT or would like a basic refresher.

This interactive session is predominantly aimed at optometrists who are new to OCT, or those who would like a basic refresher. In this session we will cover the basic principles of OCT, refresh memories on retinal anatomy and apply this to interpreting OCT images. A simple step-by-step approach to analysing OCT images will be provided. The main emphasis for this session will be on retinal imaging.

Competencies covered: Standards of Practice, Ocular Disease

Target group: Optometrist

Learning objectives:

  • To understand how the OCT works and its different optometric applications 
  • To interpret macular OCT images and recognise common abnormalities 
  • To provide a tentative diagnosis based on an OCT image and differentiate between dry and wet AMD 
Parents of children with myopia need to know that the condition is not pathological but can increase the risk of some ocular pathologies in later life. The workshop will encourage an evidence-based approach to providing this information. The workshop will update practitioners on recent developments in myopia control, but the potential of these developments will not be exaggerated. The presentation will use case studies to engage an interactive element of audience interaction.

Speakers

Professor Bruce Evans FCOptom

Director of Research
Institute of Optometry

No description provided

Dry eye remains a ‘hot topic’ and rightly so due to the prevalence, but Indie is going to provide a different perspective to get us to think more about the end goal – ocular comfort – including contact lens wearers. When we focus on the end goal, adherence to regimes we suggest should be better, rather than sometimes concentrating on the diagnosis; in some ways thinking like eczema management – with focus on restoring condition to the skin, rather than condition itself. This will cover the background to what makes us uncomfortable, where sensations come from, and what’s needed to avoid daily irritation. 

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

The session provides guidance for community optometrists on conducting cataract post-op assessments, covering equipment required, what to look out for during the eye examination, complications and recommended course of action. Attendees also can choose to join the SpaMedica Cataract Post-op Scheme to manage post-op assessments.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

A discussion workshop to discover and develop communication/analytical skills to enable accurate contact lens recommendations based on patients needs. To use these skills to deliver excellent customer service and retain patients in contact lenses.

These sessions are independently run from the main conference programme and the content may not express the views of the College.

No description provided

4.50 PM
This session will concentrate on a few urgent conditions which the speaker believes are not widely recognised as urgent. The conditions it will include are Horner’s Syndrome (Diagnosis, Investigation and Causes), Wernicke’s Encephalopathy (Nutritional Causes for diplopia), Third Nerve Palsies, Diplopia caused by Giant Cell Arteritis and then give some general pointers for diagnosing papilloedema and pseudopapilloedema.

Speakers

Rhys Harrison

Consultant
Bristol Eye Hospital, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust

No description provided

Speakers

Mike Horler MCOptom

Optometrist
Sussex Eye Hospital

In this session delegates will learn: 

  • Relevant history taking for an infant 
  • Age appropriate assessment tests and tips
  • Management of paediatric cases based on findings 

More information to follow 

Speakers

Suzanne Fraser MCOptom

Paediatric Optometrist
Bristol Eye Hospital

Parents of children with myopia need to know that the condition is not pathological but can increase the risk of some ocular pathologies in later life. The workshop will encourage an evidence-based approach to providing this information. The workshop will update practitioners on recent developments in myopia control, but the potential of these developments will not be exaggerated. The presentation will use case studies to engage an interactive element of audience interaction.

Speakers

Professor Bruce Evans FCOptom

Director of Research
Institute of Optometry

No description provided

No description provided

 

Venue

New location! 

Telford International Conference centre is a modern, purpose built conference centre which will be an ideal space for Optometry Tomorrow. Click here to download information on Telford. 

Accommodation

Rooms are being held for delegates to book at the International Hotel and The Holiday Inn. Guests can now book these by calling 01952 527000 dialling 1 for reservations or by e-mailing reservations@southwatereventgroup.com quoting 'College of Optometrists'.

International Hotel:
Saturday 22 February - £110 (single) / £120 (double)
Sunday 23 February - £70 (single) / £80 (double)
Includes VAT and continental breakfast

The Holiday Inn:
Saturday 22 February - £120 (single) / £130 (double)
Sunday 23 February - £80 (single) / £90 (double)
Includes VAT and breakfast

Any rooms unsold 8 weeks prior to arrival (28 December 2019), will be released. Guests can still call and book onto the rates after this point, provided there is general availability.

Alternative options
There are over 550 bedrooms on site or within a minutes walk of the venue. There are 1000 bedrooms within a ten minute drive. The hotels are listed below in order of distance from the conference centre. Delegates need to book accommodation themselves please click on the links below for more information.

The College does not endorse any hotels. 

The International Hotel

Holiday Inn Telford Ironbridge

Travelodge Southwater 

Ramada 

Park Inn 

Premier Inn - Telford Central

Days Inn

Haughton Hall

Premier Inn - Telford North

The Whitehouse

Telford Q

Madeley Court 

Buckatree Hall

The Valley

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Driving and parking

The Telford International Centre is a hugely accessible event destination in the heart of the UK.
There are over 1500 free car parking spaces onsite, all within easy walking distance of the venue. 
We are encouraging delegates to park near Entrance 3 as this is where delegate registration will be. 
 

Telford International Centre
St Quentin Gate
Telford, Shropshire
TF3 4JH

www.theinternationalcentretelford.com/

Here's how to find the venue:
FROM M6 SOUTHBOUND
Leave M6 at junction 12. Take A5 west for 1 mile to Gailey Island. Take first left on to A449. Travel 3 miles to M54/J2. Travel west on M54 to J4. Take the second exit and follow signs to The Telford International Centre.
FROM M6 NORTHBOUND
Join M54 at M6/J10A. Travel west to M54/J4. Take the second exit and follow signs to The Telford International Centre. The venue is situated just over 2 miles from Junction 4.
FROM M6 ‘TOLL’ NORTHBOUND
Leave M6 Toll at junction T8. This equates to M6/J11. Go straight ahead into A460 (Wolverhampton Road) towards Wolverhampton. After 2.4 miles access M54/J1. Take the third exit off the roundabout onto M54 direction Telford. Travel west on M54 to J4. Take the second exit and follow signs to The Telford International Centre. The venue is situated just over 2 miles from Junction 4.
 
Driving times to Telford
Birmingham City Centre 45 minutes
Manchester City Centre 1 hour 30 minutes
Bristol City Centre 1 hour 45 minutes
Leeds City Centre 2 hours 15 minutes
London (M25) 2 hours 15 minutes
 

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Public transport

Telford Central station is located less than a mile from the Telford International Centre and is walkable in around 15 minutes. There is also a bus service from the train station the conference centre. Bus 4 goes from the station to the conference centre. The timetable can be viewed here.

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Restaurants and shopping centre

Next to the Telford International Centre there is a large shopping centre and a number of restaurants including Nando's, Pizza Express and Zizzi. For a full list of shops and some restaurants click here. Please note parking at the shopping centre is chargeable. 

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Networking reception

Make sure you don’t miss our conference networking reception, taking place on Sunday 23 February from 5.30-7pm at the Telford conference centre within the exhibition. This is an excellent opportunity for you to:
-    network and engage after the first day of the conference
-    talk about your highlights from the day
-    speak to exhibitors
-    gain app challenge points.

The networking reception will feature our ‘topic tables’ bringing together delegates interested in a range of topics. These informal discussions last 45 minutes and are facilitated by a College representative. Topic tables will be situated in the back of Hall 3 where it is quieter. There are no CET points available for these discussions.

Bookings will open when the topics are confirmed later in the year.

The reception is included in your ticket and drinks and nibbles will be provided. You will be able to mix with other delegates, presenters, exhibitors, College Council members and staff in a relaxed and informal environment.

In previous years we have held a Gala Dinner as part of the annual conference. The networking reception has been introduced to encourage a greater networking opportunity for delegates. We hope that the reception will offer further opportunities for peer conversations and discussions and proves another opportunity for engagement with conference sponsors and exhibitors. 

 

Book later

News from sponsors

In 2020 Thea will support the optometrists in the UK with our continued investment in education and innovation.  Our continual aim is to bring the most advanced formulations in eye care, offer true patient benefits and unique preservative free products.
Our portfolio of products help alleviate Dry Eye, Blepharitis and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, along with an Eye Nutritionals to support eye health and help to protect vision.  
•    Thealoz Duo – Thea’s most advanced preservative-free combination of Sodium Hyaluronate and Trehalose - for lubrication, hydration and protection of all dry eyes.  Preservative free and suitable for contact lens wearers.
•    Hyabak – Preservative-free Sodium Hyaluronate dry eye drops that provide a hydrating and lubricating solution for eyes and contact lenses.
•    Blepha Range is the No1 lid care range in Europe offers daily gentle lid cleansing that is free from preservatives, perfumes and parabens – plus no rinsing is required as they do not contain soap.   
•    Blephademodex – Specifically designed to provide relief for symptoms caused by Demodex. Contains Terpinen-4-ol a purified active extract from Tea Tree Oil
•    Eye Nutritionals – Nutrof Total is a TOTAL formula for eye health and vision in once a day capsule, now with added Vitamin D.

For more information on our products, training and literature packages please come and see us on our stand or visit our website www.thea-pharmaceuticals.co.uk

CooperVision at Optometry Tomorrow 2020 – celebrating contact lens heroes

At this year’s Optometry Tomorrow Conference and Exhibition in Telford, CooperVision is celebrating the difference eye care professionals make every day. Under the theme of ‘Celebrating incredible contact lens heroes’, delegates will have an opportunity to share their stories of how everyday contact lens practice can make a life-changing difference to their patients.

There will be a focus on how together, CooperVision and eye care professionals are taking on some of the biggest contact lens challenges – from tackling myopia with a soft lens proven to reduce the progression of myopia in children, to taking on hypoxia through silicone hydrogel one-day options for more wearers. The challenge of overcoming contact lens wearer drop out will also be a key topic. Join us at one of our CET workshops below:  

Sunday 23rd Feb:
9.35am – Discussion workshop: Lenscape
12.05pm – Discussion workshop: The art of prescribing for myopia
3.10pm – Interactive session (myopia management)

Monday 24th Feb:
10.05am – Discussion workshop: The art of prescribing for myopia
3.45pm – Discussion workshop: Are we listening carefully?
 
CooperVision is proud to once again be a Gold sponsor of this year’s event and is looking forward to giving a warm welcome to delegates. 

At Johnson & Johnson Vision, we have a bold ambition: to change the trajectory of eye health around the world. We deliver innovative vision solutions that enable Eye Care Professionals to create better outcomes for their patients throughout their lives; from sight correction solutions including world leading surgical technologies and contact lenses, to dry eye diagnosis, treatment and management and the restoration of vision for cataract patients. Since debuting the world’s first disposable soft contact lens in 1987, we have been helping patients see better through our world-leading portfolio of ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses. Serving more than 60 million patients a day across 103 countries, we are committed to helping people see better, connect better and live better. 
Supporting further education for eye care professionals is key in making this commitment a reality. Johnson & Johnson Vision is delighted to once again be a Gold Sponsor of Optometry Tomorrow and bring you two interactive discussion workshops: ‘Through Their Eyes’ and ‘Happy Patient, Happy Life’. Book your place now. 
We look forward to welcoming you at the Johnson & Johnson Vision stand at Optometry Tomorrow 2020. For more information on our services and products please visit www.jnjvisioncare.co.uk 

The Alcon® product portfolio includes DAILIES TOTAL1® and DAILIES TOTAL1® MULTIFOCAL the first water gradient contact lenses, DAILIES® family of daily disposable contact lenses, AIR OPTIX® family of contact lenses, including our first silicone hydrogel coloured lens AIR OPTIX® COLORS, and FreshLook® color contact lenses.  Our contact lens care products include OPTI- FREE® PUREMOIST® multi-purpose disinfecting solution and AOSEPT® PLUS with HydraGlyde®.
The SYSTANE® eye drop family offers long-lasting dry eye relief through tearfilm restoration, and includes SYSTANE® ULTRA, SYSTANE® HYDRATION, SYSTANE® GEL DROPS, SYSTANE® BALANCE and the new SYSTANE® COMPLETE for mixed dry eye.
Please visit our website for more information www.myalcon.co.uk 

Entod Research Cell UK Ltd is an Ophthalmic pharmaceutical entity, part of the ENTOD International group, specializing in the design, development and manufacturing of Premium Quality Innovative Ocular Diagnostics, Specialized Dry Eye therapies, Ocular wellness solutions and consumer healthcare products. With supplies to over 55 countries worldwide, ENTOD has over 40 years of specialized ophthalmic expertise, a globally accredited international factory network and a team of over 1000 employees.

Our product range includes Ocular Diagnostic strips such as Fluorescein strips, Schirmer strips, Lissamine Green strips and Phenol Red Threads, and Dry Eye Drops for contact lens related dryness and dry eyes due to environmental factors and prolonged smartphone, computer & TV screen exposure.

At work, at school, in life, EyeDream - Ortho-k - has had a profound and positive effect on thousands of lives. We regularly hear of patients crying with joy when they remove their lenses for the first time!

So, whether it’s the WOW factor, the freedom or peace of mind offered by myopia control, EyeDream is simply different from other vision correction modalities.

Over the past 14 years, we have established EyeDream as the UK's leading ortho-k brand. With a tireless commitment to education and support, we have built a network of over 350 EyeDream centres. For every independent practice we partner with, EyeDream offers an exciting opportunity to develop a new and reliable revenue stream.
  
And we're just getting started! We’re excited about forming new EyeDream partnerships. If you would like to be part of the world’s fastest growing Ortho-k system, here are your next steps:
•    Give us a call on 01424 850620
•    We will schedule a day to visit you in practice to discuss the setup process
•    We will arrange a time for you to receive the appropriate accreditation training

And you're good to go - but you're never alone. Should you need it, our experienced and friendly support team are only a phone call away.

If you have any questions regarding Optometry Tomorrow 2020, please contact us by email or on 020 7766 4377. Alternatively read our FAQs.

With thanks to our event sponsors:

Platinum

Gold

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