Cataract and the nodal point fallacy

1 October 2009
Volume 10, Issue 4

Looking at research into posterior polar cataract and opacities elsewhere in the crystalline lens and poor vision.

Introduction

It is sometimes stated (Kanski 2007, Vishwanath et al. 2008) that a posterior polar cataract has a greater effect on making vision poorer than opacities elsewhere in the crystalline lens because it is situated at the nodal point of the eye. Brown & Bron (1996) suggest that the cause is that the opacities are along the eye’s axis, rather than the relationship with the nodal point. 

Although a posterior polar or central subcapsular cataract is indeed positioned very close to the eye’s nodal point, this article demonstrates that it is the position within the eye, not the relationship to the nodal point, that is the important one. 

Sign in to continue

Forgotten password?
Register

Sign in to view the article

Not a member? Start enjoying the benefits of College membership today. Take a look at what the College can offer you and view our membership categories and rates.

Related further reading

Seek out cutting-edge clinical content to address new challenges, says Kieran Loft MCOptom.

Read our statement on recent press articles about people who have experienced deterioration in their vision related to a batch of intraocular lenses.

This follows the same format as Mr Balaggan and Professor Gilmartin’s popular combined talks, with patients providing learning opportunities.