Face perception in health and disease (C-100597)

CPD
1
14 September 2020
Volume 21, Issue 3
AMD

This article outlines the clinical implications for patients affected by impaired face perception.

Domains covered

Professionalism Clinical practice

Face recognition is normally a rapid and effortless process enabling individuals to identify others who are familiar to them. Underlying this remarkable, but perhaps overlooked, aspect of visual function is a network of interconnected brain regions, which process the raw visual information provided by the visual system. As a result, face recognition is vulnerable to both ocular disease and neurological impairments. This article reviews current evidence about these causes of impaired face perception and outlines the clinical implications for affected patients.

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