Myopia; Development and control in children

3 October 2005
Volume 06, Issue 4

This review outlines current estimates of myopia prevalence for children, the characteristics of myopia progression and attempts to retard its progression with a variety of treatment therapies.

Introduction

This review outlines current estimates of myopia prevalence for children, the characteristics of myopia progression and attempts to retard its progression with a variety of treatment therapies. The review is restricted essentially to recent work, with over 70% of the references published since 2000. Animal work and genetics in myopia are important but not central to the optometrist’s work, which is essentially one of monitoring and management. The refractive error at 5–6 years of age and family history of myopia are still important clinical data in terms of prediction but as optometry is now moving into the area of therapeutic management, if we can manage glaucoma, then why not myopia? 

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