Myopia in practice: evidence for intervention

18 August 2015
Volume 16, Issue 3

There is growing interest in myopia and myopia control within the optometry community. This article looks at the evidence for intervention.

Introduction

Myopia is the most common human eye disorder in the world, and its public health and economic impact is considerable (Vitale et al. 2006; Zheng et al. 2013). Recently interest in myopia and myopia control has grown within the optometry community. There are a number of possible reasons for this renewed interest, for example, the increasing prevalence of myopia (Pan et al. 2012), knowledge that myopia can be considered a ‘dose-dependent’ risk factor for many sight-threatening ocular diseases (Flitcroft 2012) and a growing body of evidence to suggest that clinical intervention strategies to slow myopic progression are moderately successful (for example, Anstice and Phillips 2011; Chia et al. 2014).

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Related further reading

Here we summarise three research papers from a recent issue of Optometry in Practice.

A framework for delivering eye care to children in special schools aims to help those who often seek treatment the least, writes Anna Scott.

Adrian O’Dowd asks if the growing use of topography in community optometry will lead to wavefront analysis gaining traction as a complementary tool.